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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 895 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 706 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 615 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 536 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 465 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 417 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 414 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 393 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 376 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 369 33 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fitzhugh Lee or search for Fitzhugh Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 53 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2.12 (search)
Speech of General Fitz. Lee, at A. N. V. Banquet, October 28th, 1875. After speaking in general terms to the sentiment of the toast to the cavalry, General Lee delivered the following beautiful tribute to his old commander, General J. E. B. Stuart: Brother Confederates--I hope I may receive your pardon if 1 occupy a brief portion of your time in talking to you of the Chief of Cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia, for my thoughts just now go out, in the language of General Johnston,General Lee delivered the following beautiful tribute to his old commander, General J. E. B. Stuart: Brother Confederates--I hope I may receive your pardon if 1 occupy a brief portion of your time in talking to you of the Chief of Cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia, for my thoughts just now go out, in the language of General Johnston, to the Indefatigable Stuart. To-day, comrades, I visited his grave. He sleeps his last sleep upon a little hillside in Hollywood, in so quiet, secluded a spot that I felt indeed that no sound could awake him to glory again. A simple wooden slab marks the spot, upon which is inscribed--General Stuart, wounded May 11th, 1864; died May 12th, 1864. And there rests poor J. E. B. Stuart, It was in 1852 I first knew him, the date of my entry as a cadet in the United States Military Academy--
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of Bates' battle of Gettysburg. (search)
rces of information at all. His estimate of General Lee's force is derived entirely from the guesserily adjusted by compromise. In round numbers, Lee had 91,000 infantry and 280 pieces of artillery General Meade's estimate given above, puts General Lee's force at nearly the same. In addition to on July 1st, he applies the same arithmetic to Lee's army, and states that we may therefore fairly conclude that Lee crossed the Potomac with something over 100,000 men, and actually had upon the field in the neighborhood of 76,300. General Lee had crossed the Potomac but ten days before; hadneral Meade to fight at all. Had he allowed General Lee to march about in Pennsylvania for a month thout the sacrifices. The truth is this: General Lee left Culpeper on his march northward, June 8,352. This comprised all the troops under General Lee's command, and embraced, besides the main aare of it, as well as of the publication of General Lee's final report of the battle--Southern Maga[5 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Robert E. Park, Macon, Georgia, late Captain Twelfth Alabama regiment, Confederate States army. (search)
nd attempting his old Vicksburg manoeuvres. But he will find he has Lee and Beauregard to deal with now. Mortars are said to be mounted and ces go to show Grant's inclination to beseige rather than charge General Lee in the future. The fearful butchery of his drunken soldiers — hovement, in which Grant was to be outgeneraled as McClellan was, and Lee, as usual, grandly triumphant. None of the numerous suppositions prhe late cavalry battle-field, where Generals Hampton, Butler and Fitzhugh Lee, defeated Yankee General Sheridan, et al. A great many dead and ns of the bloody battle fought there in September, 1862, between Generals Lee and McClellan were everywhere visible. Great holes, made by canof the Capitol and other prominent buildings, Arlington Heights (General Lee's old home), and four lofty redoubts, well manned with huge, froenteel and ungenerous return for the very humane manner in which General Lee conducted his Pennsylvania campaign last year, and for the very
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Strength of General Lee's army in the Seven days battles around Richmond. (search)
ly been led into error in your estimates of General Lee's strength, and of the number of troops bro, and 2 in Whiting's division — in all, 27. General Lee had 39 brigades of infantry under his commaents, which before were in other brigades. General Lee had forty brigades of infantry at Sharpsburl appear, then, that the troops received by General Lee from the South after Seven Pines, and beforSouth. So that the whole force received by General Lee from all sources was about 23,000--about 30d we have 80,000, covering the whole o fGeneral Lee's strength. This estimate is probably too larg testing the result that has been reached. General Lee's losses in the battles were as follows: Inlish conclusively, to any candid mind, that General Lee's army, at the beginning of the battles, wae of McClellan's army as by the increase of General Lee's. One strong reason why the attack coulederate capital from the siege of 1862. If General Lee had more men than McClellan had, it would b[11 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.35 (search)
is but one who added strength to the opposing section. Thomas, alone, of them all, was able and efficient in the armies of those to whom he transferred his allegiance. And while Virginia holds up to the emulation of her youth the examples of Lee, of Jackson, and of Johnston, she will ever deplore that a son so brave and so able as Thomas was did not fight by their side. He has now gone to his account. What motives, what influences decided his course, God alone knows. But he was a losn dismounted Wilson's cavalry to furnish the cavalry reserved with his own wing with a better remount, and sent Wilson with his men dismounted to help Thomas to beat Hood, while he marched on his way to the sea with none to make him afraid. General Lee once said of Sherman's march to the sea: There was nothing to oppose him, and the only military problem to be solved was a simple calculation as to whether his army could live on the country by taking all the people had. It was well for She
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.36 (search)
m Winchester, on the Berryville pike, and cooked our rations. Lieutenant-General Anderson, with Kershaw's infantry and Fitz. Lee's cavalry division, arrived from Lee's army. Their ranks are much depleted, but a very small reinforcement will greatlLee's army. Their ranks are much depleted, but a very small reinforcement will greatly encourage and help our sadly diminished command. August 19th Marched to our familiar looking old camping ground at often-visited Bunker Hill. August 20th Twenty-four hours of rest and quiet. August 21st Marched through Smithfield Still the men remain cheerful and hopeful. September 10th Rodes' division, preceded by our cavalry, under Generals Fitzhugh Lee and Rosser, went as far as Darksville, returning to Bunker Hill at night. Our brigade acted as the immediate sup0 men for duty. General Anderson, with his infantry and artillery, has left us, and returned to Richmond, leaving only Fitz. Lee's small force of cavalry. On the contrary, rumor says Sheridan has fully 40,000 well equipped, well-clad and well-fed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Attack on Fort Gilmer, September 29th, 1864. (search)
nd the Salem artillery, Captain Griffin. These commands included all the troops engaged during the whole day, I think. The whole force was commanded by Lieutenant-General Ewell, either as commander of the Richmond defences, or of that part of General Lee's army on the north side of James river, I do not now remember which, but at any rate he was in command in person, and by his cool courage and presence wherever the fight was hottest, contributed as much to the victory gained as any one man cos ended the battle of Fort Gilmer, and there was no more fighting done on this part of the line where we were that day, though I think the part of the line occupied by Gary's cavalry was attacked, but I never knew anything about that fight. General Lee arrived from Petersburg during the night of September 29th, with Field's Virginia and Hoke's North Carolina divisions, and upon the 30th both those divisions charged Fort Harrison, but after a desperate fight they were forced to retire, and th