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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 611 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 134 60 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 70 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 48 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 48 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 41 41 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 28 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Deep Bottom (Virginia, United States) or search for Deep Bottom (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Attack on Fort Gilmer, September 29th, 1864. (search)
I do not now remember which, but at any rate he was in command in person, and by his cool courage and presence wherever the fight was hottest, contributed as much to the victory gained as any one man could have done. The Yankees landed near Deep Bottom, some ten or twelve miles below Richmond, and consisted of two entire army corps, (supposed at that time to have ten thousand men each). At Deep Bottom they came upon a picket composed of one battery of Hardaway's battalion and some infantry, Deep Bottom they came upon a picket composed of one battery of Hardaway's battalion and some infantry, and by the suddenness of their attack (which was between daybreak and sunrise) drove back our pickets, and continued to drive them until they reached Fort Harrison, a fort containing several heavy cannon, but with not more than forty or fifty men to man them. This fort the Yankees captured and kept possession of. Fort Harrison was one of a series of forts running from Chaffin's Bluff almost entirely around Richmond, and connected by earthworks for infantry, with a redoubt for field artillery w