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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 37 results in 12 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A vindication of Virginia and the South. (search)
and property. That's fair, and there is no complaint. But the Government would not stop here. It went further — protected this industry of one section and taxed that of the other; for though it suited the farmer's interest and convenience to send his wool to a New England mill to have it made into cloth, it also suited in a like degree the Southern planter to send his cotton to Old England to have it made into calico. And now came the injustice and the grievance. They both prefer the Charleston market, and they both, the illustration assumed, arrived by sea the same day and proceeded together, each with his invoice of one hundred bales, to the custom-house. There the Northern man is told that he may land his one hundred bales duty free; but the Southern man is required to leave forty of his in the custom-house for the privilege of landing the remaining sixty. The tariff at that time was forty per cent. It was in vain for the Southerner to protest or to urge, You make us pay b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Seacoast defences of South Carolina and Georgia. (search)
navigable for vessels of moderate draft from Charleston to Fernandina, Florida. There are fewer ass, the Federals having command of Helena bay, Charleston was liable to be assailed from north Edisto he state of affairs when General Lee reached Charleston, about the first of December, 1861, to assums the railroad or turned in the direction of Charleston or Savannah, they were arrested by the Confeions on this extensive line were Georgetown, Charleston, Pocotaligo, Coosawhatchie and Savannah. Cobeing central, could communicate with either Charleston or Savannah in two or three hours by railroaoosawhatchie and Savannah, and those between Charleston and Coosawhatchie, could be reinforced from eparations for a powerful attack upon either Charleston or Savannah. In anticipation of this attackse places. General Ripley, who commanded at Charleston, and General Lawton, the commander at Savann and the fleet was in the offing, blockading Charleston and Savannah. About the first of March the [2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
to be made to me. I did hear — it was mere hearsay — that statements had been made to the War Department, and that everything had been done to relieve them that could be done, even finally so far as to offer to send them to some other points — Charleston was one point named — if they would be received by the United States authorities and taken to their homes; but whether this is true or not I do not know. Q. And of course you know nothing of the scenes of cruelty about which complaints have one train of cars between Elmira and Baltimore. After being received at Savannah, they had the best attention possible, yet many died in a few days. --In carrying out the exchange of disabled, sick and wounded men, we delivered at Savannah and Charleston about 11,000 Federal prisoners, and their physical condition compared most favorably with those we received in exchange, although of course the worst cases among the Confederates had been removed by death during the passage. Richard H. Dibr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Colonel D. T. Chandler, (search)
to the hazard of exploding them and deserve credit for the act! A strange obliquity in the general-in-chief of an army which has, at the present moment, a special torpedo corps attached to it as an important defensive resource to fortified places; in one who, moreover, was carefully taught at West Point how to plant the equivalent of torpedoes as known to engineers of that date--i. e., crows'-feet, trous-de-loups, fougasses, mines, etc. For my part, from the day of the capitulation of Fort Sumter, in 1861, when, in order to save a brave soldier and his command from all unnecessary humiliation, I allowed Major Anderson the same terms offered him before the attack--i. e., to salute his flag with fifty guns, and to go forth with colors flying and drums beating,. taking off company and private property — down to the close of the war, I always favored and practiced liberal treatment of prisoners. At the same time, however, I always urged the policy of rigid and prompt retaliation, at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
of us were selected and sent to Morris' Island, in Charleston harbor, to be placed under the fire of our own batteries. We were in high spirits at starting, for we firmly believed .we were soon to be exchanged for a like number of the enemy in Charleston, In some instances men gave their gold watches to some of the lucky ones, as they were termed, to be allowed to go in their places. On the evening of the 20th we were all (600) stowed away between decks of the steamer Crescent. Bunks had beent, but the entire line. The officer then pulled his pistol, and fired it at the prisoner. He also missed. The prisoner, not liking a position where all the firing was on one side, then made good his retreat to his tent. Our authorities in Charleston and the Yankee authorities on the island exchanged a boat load of provisions, tobacco, etc., for their respective prisoners. Bread, potatoes, meat, and both smoking and chewing tobacco, were sent us by the Charleston ladies. Never was anythin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
Richmond papers. She refused to sell them for a large price, and insisted on giving them to our Society. John McRae, Esq., of Camden, S. C., has placed us under the highest obligations by presenting the following newspaper files: Charleston Courier from May 1856 to February 1865. Richmond Dispatch from April 1861 to April 1864. Charleston Mercury from July 1859 to February 1865 and from November 1866 to November 1868. Columbia Daily Carolinian from 1855 to October 1864. Charleston Daily News and News and Courier from June 1866 to this date. Camden Journal from January 1856 to this date. Southern Presbyterian from June 1858 to this date. And Dr. J. Dickson Bruns, of New Orleans, has sent us a bound volume of the Charleston Mercury for 1862. We have received recently other valuable contributions, which we have not space even to mention. Our present number has been delayed by causes over which we have had no control; but we think that we can promise tha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the Confederate States Navy. (search)
here would be no contentions, and in which the people of the South would be guaranteed equal rights with all the States. I had been in Mississippi but a few days, when the country was aware that war had commenced, and that the stronghold of Fort Sumter, in Charleston harbor, had been compelled to surrender to the Southern forces. Soon news came that Lincoln had called for 75,000 men to march upon the States which had swung loose from the Federal Union. The youth of the South sprung to armsnts Warley, Egleston and Dunnington, all of the old navy. The midshipmen were Stone, John Comstock, Blanc and Morgan. Our surgeon was Dr. Linah, of South Carolina, and the purser was the best old gentleman in the world, Mr. Sample. The steamer Sumter, a propeller of 400 tons, mounting five guns and commanded by Commander R. Semmes, was fitting out near us. Captain Semmes was untiring in his efforts to get his vessel ready for sea, and finally threw his guns aboard in a half fitted state, star
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Mecklenburg (N. C.) Historical Society. (search)
ish General Fraser, the inspiring spirit of Burgoyne's army. On our own soil we find the same heroism. When South Carolina was over-run, the guerrillas, under Sumter, Marion, Pickens, &c., drove the British back, step by step, to Charleston, where they were held in a state of siege until the end came. It is our deliberate opiCharleston, where they were held in a state of siege until the end came. It is our deliberate opinion that no battles of the Revolution will compare in brilliancy with the defence of Fort Moultrie and the defeat of Ferguson at King's Mountain, fought solely by untrained Southern troops. Our own State had the honor of shedding the first blood in the sacred cause of freedom, of first proclaiming the great principles of indepenSouth all led to freedom, and Southern statesmen have always been on the side of popular rights. Christopher Gadsden, of South Carolina, in a public address at Charleston in 1766, advocated separation from Great Britain, and he was the first man in the American Colonies to propose the es tablishment of American Independence. The
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Seacoast defences of South Carolina and Georgia. (search)
ation between the Mississippi and the Potomac. General Long omits from consideration the particularly great value of Charleston to the Confederate States as a port for the entry of military supplies from abroad, and of exportation of cotton. Besidsive works for the department. Be that so or not, the system which Beauregard found established upon the approaches to Charleston and Savannah, he radically changed with all possible energy. One material vice of the system was an extension of the lll adequate to their defence. These lines consequently were reduced and arranged upon a wholly different plan, both at Charleston and Savannah. And so comprehensive were these changes, that had General Long chanced to visit those two places and they have been the centre, but not in the military sense, which assuredly was that so occupied by Beauregard — the city of Charleston. Nevertheless, the matchless defence of that port, the most sailent feature of Confederate operations on that theatre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of a narrative received of Colonel John B. Baldwin, of Staunton, touching the Origin of the war. (search)
le in this connection to recall the fact that when soon after the capture of Fort Sumter and Mr. Lincoln's proclamation, a prominent Northern politician wrote Coloneincoln. Mr. Magruder stated that he was authorized by Mr. Seward to say that Fort Sumter would be evacuated on the Friday of the ensuing week, and that the Pawnee would sail on the following Monday for Charleston, to effect the evacuation. Mr. Seward said that secrecy was all important, and while it was extremely desirable that onel Baldwin, decisively, until they can be peaceably brought back. And open Charleston, &c., as ports of entry, with their ten per cent. tariff. What, then, would . They endeavored to reach Washington in the early part of the week in which Fort Sumter was bombarded, but were delayed by storms and high water, so that they only made the objection that all the goods would be imported through the ports of Charleston, &c., and the sources of revenue dried up. I remember, says Mr. Stuart, that
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