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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,463 127 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,378 372 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 810 42 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 606 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 565 25 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 473 17 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 373 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 372 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 232 78 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865. You can also browse the collection for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) or search for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, I. Across Sherman's track (December 19-24, 1864) (search)
person than the overseer, and so the writer and a younger sister, Metta, were usually sent to be her companions during the winter. The summers she spent with us at the old home. But in the fall of 1864, while Sherman's army was lying around Atlanta like a pent — up torrent ready to burst forth at any moment, my father was afraid to let us get out of his sight, and we all stood waiting in our defenseless homes till we could see what course the destroying flood would take. Happily for us it people in our part of Georgia had had time to get their breath once more, and began to look about for some way of bridging the gap of ruin and desolation that stretched through the entire length of our State. The Georgia Railroad, running from Atlanta to Augusta, had been destroyed to the north of us, and the Central of Georgia, from Macon to Savannah, was intact for only sixteen miles; that part of the track connecting the former city with the little station of Gordon having lain beyond the
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 3 (search)
s rapidly as it had risen. We bid our soldier friends good-by, and drove away to the Mallarys', where we spent a pleasant day and night. Gen. and Mrs. Dahlgren called after dinner and said that we ought to have stopped with them. Mrs. Dahlgren is a beautiful woman, and only twentytwo years old, while her husband is over sixty. He is a pompous old fellow and entertained us by telling how his influence made Gen. Joseph E. Johnston commander-in-chief of the Army of Tennessee; how Hood lost Atlanta by not following his (Dahlgren's) advice; how he was the real inventor of the Dahlgren gun, which is generally attributed to his brother, the Yankee admiral-and so on. March 23, Thursday We left the Mallarys' soon after breakfast and were successful in crossing the creek. It seems hard to believe that this stream, which is giving so much trouble now, will be as dry as a baked brick next summer. The road on the other side was fairly good and we got home long before dinner-time. No
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 4 (search)
rval for Mett and me. We can then go home by way of Atlanta. It is something to think we will be able to go alce, though not to compare with their pretty home in Atlanta, that the Yankees destroyed. Cousin Bolling's hospgone, and the railroad won't be finished through to Atlanta for a week or ten days yet. If ever I do get back h them are sad. She was called the hospital angel in Atlanta, and well deserved the name. The Cuthbert Thespesday The first train on the Georgia R. R., from Atlanta to Augusta, was scheduled to run through to-day, ane started off on the Macon & Western so as to reach Atlanta in time to take the next one down, to-morrow. There country people who said that the down train from Atlanta had been captured and the Yankees were just five mi tantalizing news that we might have got through to Atlanta if we had gone straight on. The Yankees were twelve companions on yesterday's wild-goose chase towards Atlanta were aboard, and we also found Mrs. Walthall, going
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 5 (search)
oodle went to town and stole a little pony; He stuck a feather in his crown and called him Macaroni. They followed the Yanks nearly to their camping ground at the Mineral Spring, singing and jeering at the negroes, and strange to say, the Yankees did not offer to molest them. I have not laid eyes on one of the creatures myself, and they say they do not intend to come into the town unless to put down disturbances --the sweet, peaceful lambs! They never sacked Columbia; they never burnt Atlanta; they never left a black trail of ruin and desolation through the whole length of our dear old Georgia! No, not they! I wonder how long this sugar and honey policy is to continue. They deceive no one with their Puritanical hypocrisy, bringing our own runaway negroes here to protect us. Next thing they will have a negro garrison in the town for our benefit. Their odious old flag has not yet been raised in the village, and I pray God they will have the grace to spare us that insult, at l
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 7 (search)
led by these Yankees who are in the South, and see the working of things, I do not believe emancipation would be forced on us in such a hurry; but unfortunately, the government is in the hands of a set of crazy abolitionists, who will make a pretty mess, meddling with things they know nothing about. Some of the Yankee generals have already been converted from their abolition sentiments, and it is said that Wilson is deviled all but out of his life by the negroes in South-West Georgia. In Atlanta, Judge Irvin says he saw the corpses of two dead negroes kicking about the streets unburied, waiting for the public ambulance to come and cart them away. June 4, Sunday Still another batch of Yankees, and one of them proceeded to distinguish himself at once, by capturing a negro's watch. They carry out their principles by robbing impartially, without regard to race, color, or previous condition. ‘Ginny Dick has kept his watch and chain hid ever since the bluecoats put forth this act