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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 65 65 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 64 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 63 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 59 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 57 3 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 55 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 51 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 43 1 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. You can also browse the collection for Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) or search for Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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unted the brain of the excitable and self-sufficient Yankee. But the intoxicating idea was rudely disturbed; though not by any aggressive power desirous of forestalling Northern ambition by a similar career of conquest and domination. Even in this struggle, and toward the Border States, Southern leaders have shown no desire to act aggressively. The following was General Lee's address to the people of Maryland on entering their territory: Headquarters, Army of Northern Virginia, Near Frederick, Monday, Sept. 8th, 1862. to the people of Maryland. It is right that you should know the purpose that has brought the army under my command within the limits of your State, so far as that purpose concerns yourselves. The people of the Confederate States have long watched with the deepest sympathy the wrongs and outrages that have been inflicted upon the citizens of a commonwealth allied to the States of the South by the strongest social, political, and commercial ties, and reduced to
lodge it. From the eleventh to the thirteenth, little or nothing was attempted by him, save frequent reconnoissances; and although the roads from the Monocacy to Frederick Some very amusing scenes occurred in Frederick during our retreat from that place. On the morning of the twelfth few troops were there save two or three squaFrederick during our retreat from that place. On the morning of the twelfth few troops were there save two or three squadrons of Stuart's cavalry. Burnside's forces were rapidly advancing upon the town, and his cavalry were not more than two miles distant. Leave-takings were going on, and patriotic young Marylanders, who had joined our army, were on door-steps, talking to or kissing their sweethearts, desirous of remaining until the last moment. Ang McClellan's advance, Jackson and others were busily availing themselves of the precious time thus gained to achieve success at the Ferry. Having started from Frederick on the eleventh, Jackson rapidly pushed ahead on the Hagerstown road, as if intending to occupy that place, but immediately branched off to the left towards the
Chapter 43: McClellan's unaccountable inaction activity of Lee and Jackson engagements at the South Mountain approach of the Federals to Sharpsburgh battle of Antietam, or Sharpsburgh, September seventeenth an indecisive engagement retreat of the Southern army into Virginia Jackson guards the rear, and repulse of the enemy's advance guard, etc. From a general review of our operations between the time of Jackson's departure from Frederick on the eleventh and the surrender of Harper's Ferry on the fifteenth, and from an estimate of the forces and the distance of the two armies operating within so few miles of each other during that time, McClellan's tardiness of action, in the face of Jackson's small force and activity, seemed to me inexplicable. The advance posts of the Federal cavalry exchanged shots with ours on the banks of the Monocacy on the eleventh, and at that time the true state of affairs must have been known to Federal commanders, for Union sympathiz