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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 608 608 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for April, 1865 AD or search for April, 1865 AD in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
uly 24, 1861. Secretary of War: Leroy P. Walker (Ala.), Feb. 21, 1861 Secretary of War: Judah P. Benjamin (La.), Sept. 17, 1861. Secretary of the Navy: Stephen R. Mallory (Fla.), Feb. 25, 1861. Secretary of the Treasury: Charles G. Memminger (S. C.), Feb. 21, 1861. Attorney-General: Judah P. Benjamin, Feb. 25, 1861 Attorney-General: Thomas Bragg, (Ala.), Sept. 17, 1861. Postmaster-General: J. H. Reagan (Texas), March 6, 1861. Ii. Reorganization. (Feb. 22, 1862, to April, 1865.) Secretary of State: R. M. T. Hunter, July 24, 1861 Secretary of State: Judah P. Benjamin, March 17, 1862. Secretary of War: Judah P. Benjamin, Sept. 17, 1861 Secretary of War: George W. Randolph, March 17, 1862 Secretary of War: Gustavus W. Smith, acting, Nov. 17, 1862 Secretary of War: James A. Seddon, Nov. 20, 1862 Secretary of War: John C. Breckinridge, Jan. 28, 1865. Secretary of the Navy : Stephen R. Mallory. Secretary of the Treasury: C. G. Memminger Secr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Confederate Government at Montgomery. (search)
, of the crop of 1861, 2,000,000 more bales might be obtained afterward. By using this cotton as security, or shipping it abroad, he maintained the finances of the Confederate States could at once be placed on a solid basis. His plan met with much favor, but was opposed by the administration and was not carried through. Money for the long war was to be raised by loans from Confederate citizens on bonds supplemented by the issue of Treasury notes and by a duty on exported cotton. In April, 1865, after the collapse of the Confederacy, Mr. Barnwell, who had steadfastly supported Mr. Davis in the Confederate Senate, met the writer at Greenville, S. C., where Governor Magrath had summoned the Legislature of the State to assemble. There, in conversation, Mr. Barnwell explicitly expressed his judgment in the following words: Mr. Davis never had any policy; he drifted, from the beginning to the end of the war. For practical regret at the issue of the secession movement, the time ha