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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 1,039 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 833 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 656 14 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 580 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 459 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 435 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 355 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 352 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Jefferson Davis or search for Jefferson Davis in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
onstruction, equipment, and repair. Chief Naval Constructor John Lenthall. (By act of July 5, 1862, the Equipment and recruiting Bureau was organized, and thereafter the old bureau was designated as Construction and repair. ) Provisions and clothing Pay-Director Horatio Bridge. Medicine and Surgery Surgeon William Whelan. Steam-engineering (established by act of July 5, 1862) Engineer-in-Chief Benjamin F. Isherwood. The Confederate States Government. President: Jefferson Davis (Miss.) Vice-President: Alexander H. Stephens (Ga.) I. Provisional organization. (Feb. 8, 1861.) Secretary of State: Robert Toombs (Ga.), Feb. 21, 1861 Secretary of State: R. M. T. Hunter, (Va.) July 24, 1861. Secretary of War: Leroy P. Walker (Ala.), Feb. 21, 1861 Secretary of War: Judah P. Benjamin (La.), Sept. 17, 1861. Secretary of the Navy: Stephen R. Mallory (Fla.), Feb. 25, 1861. Secretary of the Treasury: Charles G. Memminger (S. C.), Feb. 21, 1861. At
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first step in the War. (search)
Congratulations were exchanged on so happy a result. Major Anderson stated that he had instructed his officers only to fire on the batteries and forts, and not to fire on private property. The terms of evacuation offered by General Beauregard were generous, and were appreciated by Major Anderson. The garrison was to embark on the 14th, after running up and saluting the United States flag, and to be carried Fort Sumter after the bombardment, from a sketch made in April, 1861. Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America. From a photograph. to the United States fleet. A soldier killed during the salute was buried inside the fort, the new Confederate garrison uncovering during the impressive ceremonies. Major Anderson and his command left the harbor, bearing with them the respect and admiration of the Confederate soldiers. The officers, under General Beauregard, of the batteries surrounding Fort Sumter were: Sullivan's Island, Brigadier-General R
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Confederate Government at Montgomery. (search)
nited States Government against Virginia, as Mr. Davis says in his Rise and fall of the Confederatepon men, the election should take place. Jefferson Davis was put forward by the Mississippi delegaarnwell, however, was an active supporter of Mr. Davis, and it was afterward said that while in Waspermanent on the 6th of November, 1861, when Mr. Davis and Mr. Stephens were unanimously elected foident, they resorted to secret sessions. Mr. Davis offered the office of Secretary of State to epted the office with the understanding that Mr. Davis would direct and control its business, whichood sense, who had served in the Senate with Mr. Davis, and had been chairman of the Committee on , a graduate at West Point in the class with Mr. Davis. He went to Montgomery to tender a regimentaccepting more men was the want of arms, and Mr. Davis's book is an apology for not procuring them.pressed his judgment in the following words: Mr. Davis never had any policy; he drifted, from the b[15 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McDowell's advance to Bull Run. (search)
uguration of Pierce, who had defeated him for the presidency. Jefferson Davis, Pierce's Secretary of War, and General Scott had quarreled, a was vain and somewhat petulant. He loved the Union and hated Jefferson Davis. By authority of President Buchanan, Scott assembled a sma elements, with war as its immediate purpose, was a simple matter. Davis had only to accept and arrange, according to his ample information hurried to the Confederacy and placed themselves at the disposal of Davis, and officers from all the corps of the regular army, most of them remained, went South and awaited assignment to the duties for which Davis might regard them as best qualified. All Confederate offices were opposed by General Joseph E. Johnston. The Confederate President, Davis, then in Richmond, with General R. E. Lee as military adviser, exerated by the following telegram on the 17th of July from him to Jefferson Davis: The enemy has assaulted my outposts in heavy force. I have f
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Incidents of the first Bull Run. (search)
from Adjutant-General Cooper about midnight. This was the famous dispatch that has led to so much controversy between Mr. Davis and General Johnston, as to whether it was a peremptory order, or simply permission to Johnston to go to Beauregard's sittle by a gentleman on horseback, who was lifting his hat to every one he met. From the likeness I had seen of President Jefferson Davis, I instantly recognized him and told Shumate who it was. With the impulsiveness of his nature, Shumate dashed up to the President, seized his hand, and huzzaed at the top of his voice. I could see that Mr. Davis was greatly amused, and I was convulsed with laughter. When they came within twenty steps of me, where I had halted to let the group pass, Shumateement. This subject was the cause of sharp irritation between our commanding generals at Manassas on the one hand, and Mr. Davis and his Secretary of War, Mr. Benjamin, on the other. There was a disposition in the quartermaster's and commissary de
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Responsibilities of the first Bull Run. (search)
e South was inevitable. But I soon incurred Mr. Davis's displeasure by protesting against an illegry of War. Dr. Bledsoe told his wife that President Davis handed the letter to him, with the remarkgard. This letter is in reply to one from Mr. Davis, to the effect that statements had been wide question might have been necessary; but, as Mr. Davis will give no more orders to generals, and asot possibly have written to the contrary. Mr. Davis has a few words of praise for General Johnst Rise and fall, I., 347).-editors. As to Mr. Davis's telegram ( Rise and fall, I., 348) Thisasserted ( Rise and fall, I., 354) Not by Mr. Davis, but in a letter from General Thomas Jordan,d and G. W. Smith. These officers were with Mr. Davis in the quarters of General Beauregard, whoseticism or comment. In the same paragraph Mr. Davis expresses surprise at the weakness of the arreturning. This terminated the conference. Mr. Davis says, in regard to the reinforcements asked [40 more...]<
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
Captains Colton Greene and Basil W. Duke to Montgomery, Alabama, and Judge Cooke to Virginia to obtain these things By Mr. Davis's order the arms were turned over to Duke and Greene at Baton Rouge, and were by them taken to St. Louis. Before they drilling and disciplining his men there in conformity to the laws of the State and under the flag of the Union, when Jefferson Davis's gift to Missouri was taken into the camp. Blair and Lyon, to whom every detail of the Governor's scheme had beMcCulloch, one of the bravest of men and best of scouts, looking at us through the eyes of the young army officers whom Mr. Davis had sent to teach him how to organize, equip, and fight an army scientifically, saw in the Missourians nothing but a haernor and General Price sent me to Richmond, after the capture of Lexington, as a special commissioner to explain to President Davis the condition of affairs in Missouri, and to negotiate a treaty of alliance with the Confederate States, inasmuch as
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
med, noisy camp-followers. It was therefore fortunate for the Confederates that on the 10th of January, 1862, Major-General Earl Van Dorn was appointed by Jefferson Davis to the command of the Trans-Mississippi Department, and that he took charge of the combined forces about to confront Curtis. He was a. graduate of West Pointts position behind Sugar Creek. General Asboth's division held the extreme right, on the entrance of the Bentonville road, Colonel Osterhaus's was on his left, Colonel Davis's in the center, and Colonel Carr's, which during the 5th had retreated from Cross Hollows (Camp Halleck) behind Sugar Creek, was posted on the extreme left. ith Drew's and Stand Watie's Indian regiments, and Sims's and Welch's cavalry. McCulloch was farther to the left with Hebert and Mcintosh, who became engaged with Davis's division — at first with the brigade of Julius White, who retired a short distance when Pattison came up and aided him in flanking McCulloch's line.-editors. the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Marshall and Garfield in eastern Kentucky. (search)
force assigned to him was very small, considering the interests involved and the objects to be attained. The occupation of eastern Kentucky would have required an army of several thousand men. In response to his request for reinforcements, President Davis wrote to General Marshall that they were sorely pressed on every side, and were unable to send him any troops. It was a very severe winter, and Marshalls men were poorly clad, and many of the soldiers were nearly naked. One regiment hadpline to its last extremity. With his little command Marshall afterward successfully defended the vital interests of the Confederacy in south-west Virginia, so long as he remained in the service. In the summer of 1863 he was transferred to the Mississippi Department, but resigned his commission because he believed that he had been badly treated by President Davis in not having received the governmental support which he thought he deserved and which the necessities of his command required.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
at respect had never been so gaping as in 1861. General Scott was then old and passing away, and the North caught eagerly at the promise held out by George B. McClellan; while the South, with as much precipitation, pinned its faith and hopes on Albert Sidney Johnston. There is little doubt that up to the surrender of Fort Donelson the latter was considered the foremost soldier of all who chose rebellion for their part. When the shadow of that first great failure fell upon the veteran, President Davis made haste to reassure him of his sympathy and unbroken confidence. In the official correspondence which has survived the Confederacy there is nothing so pathetic, and at the same time so indicative of the manly greatness of Albert Sidney Johnston, as his letter in reply to that of his chief. In this letter dated Decatur, Ala., March 18th, 1862, General Johnston says in part: The blow [Fort Donelson] was most disastrous and almost without remedy. I therefore in my first report rema
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