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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 865 67 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 231 31 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 175 45 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 153 9 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 139 19 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 122 6 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 91 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 89 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 88 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 55 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Albert Sidney Johnston or search for Albert Sidney Johnston in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Responsibilities of the first Bull Run. (search)
generals were the most prominent, of course. All had resigned within the time prescribed. Their relative rank in the United States Army just before secession had been: 1st, J. E. Johnston, Brigadier-General; 2d, Samuel Cooper, Colonel; 3d, A. S. Johnston, Colonel; 4th, R. E. Lee, Lieutenant-Colonel; and 5th, G. T. Beauregard, Major. All of them but the third had had previous appointments, when, on the 31st of August, the Confederate Government announced new ones: Cooper's being dated May 16th, A. S. Johnston's May 28th, Lee's June 14th, J. E. Johnston's July 4th, and Beauregard's July 21st. So the law was violated, 1st, by disregarding existing commissions; 2d, by giving different instead of the same dates to commissions; and 3d, by not recognizing previous rank in the United States Army. The only effect of this triple violation of law was to reduce J. E. Johnston from the first to the fourth place, which, of course, must have been its object. Mr. Davis continues: It is a notewo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
mand (January 29th) of the District of the Trans-Mississippi, constituting a part of General Albert Sidney Johnston's extensive department. He was a dashing soldier, and a very handsome man, and his er to Beauregard, who had lately assumed command of the defenses of that river, that General Albert Sidney Johnston ordered Van Dorn to move his army to within supporting distance of Beauregard. This Van Dorn began to do on the 17th of March, on which day he wrote to General Johnston that he would soon relieve Beauregard by giving battle to the enemy near New Madrid, or, by marching boldly and raacross the mountains of North Arkansas toward Jacksonport, Van Dorn was suddenly ordered by General Johnston on the 23d of March to move his entire command by the best and most expeditious route to Meuri Brigade embarking on the 8th of April for Memphis, just as Pope was taking possession of Island No.10, and Beauregard was leading Johnston's army back to Corinth from the fateful field of Shiloh.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The defense of Fort Henry. (search)
in an ordinary February riseat least.two feet under water. This alarming fact was also communicated to the State authorities, only to evoke the curt notification that the State forces had been transferred to the Confederacy, and that I should apply to. General Polk, then in command at Columbus, Ky. This suggestion was at once acted on,--not once only, but with a frequency and urgency commensurate with its seeming importance,--the result being that I was again referred, this time to General A. S. Johnston, who at once dispatched an engineer (Major Jeremy F. Gilmer). to investigate and remedy; but it was now too late to do so effectually, though an effort was made looking to that end, by beginning to: fortify the heights on. the west bank (Fort Heiman). The armament of the fort at the time I assumed command consisted of 6 smooth-bore 32-pounders and 1 6-pounder iron-gun; February 1st,:1862, by the persistent efforts of General Lloyd Tilghman and Colonel A. Heiman, this had been, increa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Holding Kentucky for the Union. (search)
of the year 28 regiments of infantry, 6 of cavalry, and 3 batteries had been organized. On September 15th General Albert Sidney Johnston assumed command of the Confederate forces in the West, and at once ordered General Buckner with five thousandorn and returned to Bowling Green. Rousseau's advance to Nolin and the arrival of large reinforcements there induced Johnston to move his headquarters from Columbus to Bowling Green, and on October 15th he sent Hardee with 1,200 men from that plaby him as idle. I would as soon, he wrote to McClellan, expect to meet the Army of the Potomac marching up the road, as Johnston. His policy of quiet had to be laid aside when, early in December, Morgan and Helm burned the Bacon Creek bridge in havalry. Nothing else of moment occurred on Buell's main line until the capture of Forts Henry and Donelson compelled Johnston to retire from Bowling Green and leave the road to Nashville open. The letter which follows shows Mr. Lincoln's ideas
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Marshall and Garfield in eastern Kentucky. (search)
Marshall and Garfield in eastern Kentucky. The Rev. Edward O. Guerrant, Assistant Adjutant-General to General Marshall. On the 10th of September, 1861, General Albert Sidney Johnston, one of the five officers who then held the rank of General in the Confederate army, was assigned to the command of Department No. 2, embracing the States of Tennessee and Arkansas, and that part of the State of Mississippi west of the New Orleans, Jackson and Great Northern and Central Railroad; also, the milside, and were unable to send him any troops. It was a very severe winter, and Marshalls men were poorly clad, and many of the soldiers were nearly naked. One regiment had 350 barefooted men and not over 100 blankets for 700 men. General Albert Sidney Johnston, observing their condition, sent them one thousand suits of clothes, including hats and shoes. These supplies reached the army at Whitesburg, Ky. An incident connected with the distribution of them will serve to illustrate the povert
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
itation, pinned its faith and hopes on Albert Sidney Johnston. There is little doubt that up to theo indicative of the manly greatness of Albert Sidney Johnston, as his letter in reply to that of hiser dated Decatur, Ala., March 18th, 1862, General Johnston says in part: The blow [Fort Donelson] waile to the right of the picture. when General Johnston assumed command of the Western Departmentmberland and Tennessee rivers. Not until General Johnston established his headquarters at Nashvillee given it. it is to be presumed that General Johnston was satisfied with the defenses thus proventration a work of but few hours. Still General Johnston persisted in fighting for Nashville, and t telegraph station with a dispatch to Albert Sidney Johnston, then in command of the Department, aselson was to cover the movement of General Albert Sidney Johnston's army from Bowling Green to Nashventire force. General Floyd replied that General Johnston's army had already reached Nashville, whe
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
reason to hope that he would be unable to point his guns accurately. Again the smoke-stacks took fire, and were soon put out; and then the roar of the enemy's guns began, and from Batteries Nos. 2, 3, and 4 on the mainland came the continued crack and scream of their rifle-shells, which seemed to unite with the electric batteries of the clouds to annihilate us. Brigadier-General W. W. MacKALLall, C. S. A., in command at Island number10, previously Assistant Adjutant-General to General Albert Sidney Johnston. From a photograph. While nearing the island or some shoal point, during a few minutes of total darkness, we were startled by the order, Hard a-port! from our brave and skillful pilot, First Master William R. Hoel. We almost grazed the island, and it appears were not observed through the storm until we were close in, and the enemy, having no time to point his guns, fired at random. In fact, we ran so near that the enemy did not, probably could not, depress his guns suffic
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at New Madrid (Island number10), Fort Pillow, and Memphis. (search)
, Col. R. P. Neely; 5th Tenn., Col. W. E. Travis; 31st Tenn., Col. W. M. Bradford; 40th Tenn., Col. C. C. Henderson; 46th Tenn., Col. John M. Clark; 55th Tenn., Col. A. J. Brown. Cavalry: Hudson's and Wheeler's companies, Miss.; Neely's and Haywood's companies, Tenn. Light Artillery: Point Coup6e, La. Battery, Capt. R. A. Stewart; Tenn. Battery, Capt. Smith P. Bankhead. Tenn. Heavy Artillery: Companies of Captains Jackson, Sterling, Humes, Hoadley, Caruthers, Jones, Dismuke, Bucker, Fisher, Johnston, and Upton. Engineer Corps: Captains A. B. Gray and D. B. Harris. Sappers and Miners: Capt. D. Wintter. Confederate naval forces at Island number10. Flag-Officer George N. Hollins. McRae (flag-ship), Lieut. Thomas B. Huger, 6 32-pounders, 1 9-inch, 1 24-pounder rifle; Livingston, Comr. R. F. Pinkney; Polk, Lieut.-Comr. J. H. Carter, 5 guns; Pontchartrain, Lieut.-Comr. John W. Dunnington; Maurepas, Lieut. Joseph Fry, 5 rifled guns; Jackson, Lieut. F. B. Renshaw, 2 guns; Floating Battery,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The battle of Shiloh. (search)
oned depot at the time in the Confederacy. Albert Sidney Johnston occupied Bowling Green, Ky., with a large ff the country people estimated the stragglers from Johnston's army as high as twenty thousand. Of course, thided, and straggling, and his commander, General Albert Sidney Johnston, was dead. I was glad, however, to seet, neither did I receive an answer. General Albert Sidney Johnston, who commanded the Confederate forces acouragement to the National soldiers. I had known Johnston slightly in the Mexican war, and later as an offic ; but after studying the orders and dispatches of Johnston I am compelled to materially modify my views of thctions. General Beauregard was next in rank to Johnston, and succeeded to the command, which he retained tme of these critics claim that Shiloh was won when Johnston fell, and that if he had not fallen the army underng engagements; and the fact that when he was shot Johnston was leading a brigade to induce it to make a charg
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Shiloh reviewed. (search)
ushing back the enemy's light troops, until Nelson and Crittenden reached the very position occupied by Hurlbut, Prentiss, and W. H. L. Wallace at 4 o'clock the previous day, where the enemy was found in force. McCook was on the north side of the western Corinth road, and eventually swept across half of McClernand's camp and released his headquarters from the grasp of the enemy. The Hornets' Nest was in front of Crittenden's left brigade, and the peach orchard and the ground where Albert Sidney Johnston fell were in front of Nelson. Without following the vicissitudes of the struggle in this part of the field, I enter with a little more detail, but still cursorily, upon the operations of Grant's troops, which have not been connectedly explained in any official report. The action here was commenced by Lew Wallace, one of whose batteries at half-past 5 o'clock opened fire on the enemy, who was discovered on the Major-General Thomas L. Crittenden. From a photograph. high ground
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