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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 730 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 693 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 408 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 377 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 355 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 345 5 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 308 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 280 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 254 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 219 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for John Pope or search for John Pope in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McDowell's advance to Bull Run. (search)
not allowed to bear the expense of his contingent, but his services were accepted, and he received as lieutenant the first appointment to the army from civil life during the war. He accepted a position on General Mansfield's staff and accompanied that officer to Newport News, where, as captain on the staff, he distinguished himself in several daring adventures, sometimes undertaken with the object of getting information of the enemy. In the second Bull Run campaign he was aide-de-camp to General Pope. Afterward he joined his regiment, the 14th regulars, and he was brevetted major and lieutenant-colonel for gallant service at the wilderness and at Spotsylvania. we are indebted to Mr. Murat Halstead, editor of the Cincinnati commercial Gazette, for the Drake De Kay pass, here reproduced in fac-simile. Of the uses of a bold signature on the passes, Mr. Halstead writes with a characteristic touch of humor: a statement I have heard, that the famous Drake De Kay passes were written to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
a great battle on the Tennessee, one which would settle the campaign in the West. He consequently ordered Curtis not to advance any farther into Arkansas; and sent out of Missouri all the troops that could be safely taken thence, some of them to Pope on the Mississippi, and others to Grant on the Tennessee. The concentration of Federal armies on the Mississippi portended such danger to Beauregard, who had lately assumed command of the defenses of that river, that General Albert Sidney Johnwhich he had given the name of the Army of the West, were accordingly concentrated in all haste at Des Are, on the White River, whence they were to take boats for Memphis. The first division of this army, to the command of which General Price had been assigned, was the first to move, Little's Missouri Brigade embarking on the 8th of April for Memphis, just as Pope was taking possession of Island No.10, and Beauregard was leading Johnston's army back to Corinth from the fateful field of Shiloh.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In command in Missouri. (search)
with 5000, upon Ironton; and Price, with an estimated force of 25,000, upon Lyon, at Springfield. Their movement was intended to overrun Missouri, and, supported by a friendly population of over a million, to seize upon St. Louis and make that city a center of operations for the invasion of the loyal States. To meet this advancing force I had 23,000 men of all arms. Of this only some 15,000 were available, the remainder being three-months men whose term of service was expiring. General John Pope was fully occupied in North Missouri with nearly all my disposable force, which was required to hold in check rebellion in that quarter. For the defense of Cairo B. M. Prentiss had 8 regiments, but 6 were three-months men, at the end of their term, unpaid, and unwilling to reenlist. At Springfield General Lyon had about 6000 men, unpaid and badly fed, and in need of clothing. In this condition he was in hourly expectation of being attacked by the enemy, who was advancing in three ti
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 8.25 (search)
ought without water, their parched lips cracking, their tongues swollen, and the blood running down their chins when they bit their cartridges and the saltpeter entered their blistered lips. But not a word of murmuring. The morning of the 20th broke, but no reinforcements had come, and still the men fought on. No reinforcements reached Colonel Mulligan, though efforts were made to relieve him. September 16th, Sturgis with 1,100 men, but without artillery or cavalry, was ordered by General Pope to proceed from Macon City for the purpose. He did so, but his messenger to Mulligan being intercepted by General Price, the latter, on the 19th, dispatched a force of 3000 men or more under General Parsons and Colonel Congreve Jackson across the river to repel Sturgis's advance, then within fifteen miles of Lexington. Sturgis, being informed of Mulligan's situation, retreated to Fort Leavenworth. Parsons recrossed the river and took part in the fighting during the afternoon.-editors.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
cing toward the south. Curtis expected to be attacked from the south, and had made all his preparations accordingly. I was, however, doubtful whether the enemy would knock his head against a position naturally so strong, and for this reason expected the main attack from the direction of Bentonville against Asboth's division, i. e., against our right flank and rear. To ascertain, therefore, what was going on during the night in the direction mentioned, I sent out two of my scouts (Brown and Pope) with some cavalry, to proceed as far as possible toward the west and north-west, and report any movement of hostile troops immediately. Toward morning they reported that during the night troops and trains were moving on the back road, around our position toward Cross Timber; that they had heard the noise of wagons or artillery, but they had not seen the troops. I then ordered Lieutenant Schramm, of my staff, to go out with an escort and bring in more information. This was at 5 o'clock in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
After the evacuation of New Madrid, which General Pope had forced by blockading the river twelve m was by the river south of Island Number10. General Pope, with an army of twenty thousand men, was ogun-boat was absolutely necessary to enable General Pope to succeed in his operations against the enand the eastern shore of the Mississippi. That Pope and Foote apprehended this, appears from the co 43d Ohio, and Captain Louis H. Marshall of General Pope's staff on board, made a reconnoissance tweurning to New Madrid, we were instructed by General Pope to attack the enemy's batteries of six 64-pfederates had ceased firing. I reported to General Pope that we had cleared the opposite shores of iloh. The other Confederates retreating before Pope's advance, were nearly all overtaken and capturs on the Tennessee shore. The result of General Pope's operations in connection with the servicewas ready at any time to make the attempt. But Pope and his army (with the exception of 1,500 men) [9 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Sawing out the channel above Island number10. (search)
y land was impossible, New Madrid and the right bank below being occupied by General Pope. The gun-boats under Foote held the river above, and our heavy batteries co place of debarkation below. Having accomplished this much, the problem for General Pope to solve was to cross his army to make an attack, for which purpose he judgete of the bayous to New Madrid. This route we carefully explored, and I reached Pope's headquarters about dark. When in my report of the interview I mentioned Footeprovided for, and that I would have the boats through in fourteen days. General Pope then gave me an order on the authorities at Cairo for steamboats and materiat half-way through the channel, I left the flotilla and reported progress to General Pope. Upon a reexamination of the ground from Fort Thompson, he concluded that iriting the above, I have just seen for the first time, contain a letter from General Pope to me, which I never before heard of (dated the day I was on my way back fro
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at New Madrid (Island number10), Fort Pillow, and Memphis. (search)
The opposing forces at New Madrid (Island number10), Fort Pillow, and Memphis. The composition and losses of each army as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured.-editors. Union army at New Madrid. Major-Gen. John Pope. first division, Brig.-Gen. David S. Stanley. First Brigade, Col. John Groesbeck: 27th Ohio, Col. John W. Fuller; 39th Ohio, Major Edward F. Noyes. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 5 = 7. Second Brigade, Col. J. L. Kirby Smith: 43d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Wager Swayne; 63d Ohio, Col. John W. Sprague. Brigade loss: w, 5. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Schuyler Hamilton. First Brigade, Col. W. H. Worthington: 59th Ind., Col. J. I. Alexander; 5th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Charles L. Matthies. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 4 = 6. Second Brigade, Col. Nicholas Perezel: 10th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. William E. Small; 26th Mo., Col. George B. Boomer. Artillery: 11
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
ilroad, about 40 miles from Bowling Green. General Grant had about 20,000 men in hand at or about Cairo, ready to move either upon Fort Henry or Fort Donelson. General Pope, having a force of not less than 30,000 men in Missouri, was menacing General Polk's positions, including New Madrid, while General Halleck, exercising commandss to the Tennessee River in the quarter of Paris, to watch and report all material movements upon either river. Reliable information reached me that while General Pope was on his march on the Missouri side of the Mississippi, to strike at New Madrid, such was the urgency of the danger impending by way of the Tennessee River tederal general's reports of the period, a supposed Confederate army of from 50,000 to 60,000 men were concentrated. Previously, or as early as the 3d of March, Pope, with about 19,000 present for duty, had appeared before New Madrid, in Missouri, the essentially weak or most vulnerable point of our upper Mississippi defenses.