hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 232 36 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 167 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 120 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 79 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 68 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 58 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 53 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 51 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 48 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 60 results in 14 document sections:

1 2
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
ard by giving battle to the enemy near New Madrid, or, by marching boldly and rapidly toward St. Louis, between Ironton and the enemy's grand depot at Rolla. While he was executing this plan, and while the greater part of the army that had survived Elkhorn was on the march across the mountains of North Arkansas toward Jacksonport, Van Dorn was suddenly ordered by General Johnston on the 23d of March to move his entire command by the best and most expeditious route to Memphis. His forces, to which he had given the name of the Army of the West, were accordingly concentrated in all haste at Des Are, on the White River, whence they were to take boats for Memphis. The first division of this army, to the command of which General Price had been assigned, was the first to move, Little's Missouri Brigade embarking on the 8th of April for Memphis, just as Pope was taking possession of Island No.10, and Beauregard was leading Johnston's army back to Corinth from the fateful field of Shiloh.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
Cavalry, withstood the incessant onslaught of the two Confederate brigades of Colonel Little and General Slack and the Missouri State Guards with the greatest tenacity, yielding only step by step, when exhausted by losses and without ammunition. The death of McCulloch was not only fatal to his troops, but also a most serious blow to Van Dorn. Until 2 o'clock on the 7th, the latter had confidently expected to hear of successful action against our left wing; but he received no answer to the dispatch he had sent, and began to push forward his own wing. He succeeded, and when night fell made his headquarters at Elkhorn Tavern, where Carr and Major Weston of our army had been in the morning. But here he stopped. He says that by some misunderstanding the troops in the advance were called back (as they were at Shiloh); the true reason for their withdrawal, however, seems to have been their satisfaction with what they had done, and the assurance of completing the work in the morning.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., General Polk and the battle of Belmont. (search)
subsequently sent across the river, and more or less engaged, the Confederates may be estimated at not less than five thousand.-editors. In comparing this engagement with other battles of the war the points of resemblance between it and that of Shiloh, fought six months later and upon a much more extended scale, must strike every observer. If Shiloh was a defeat for the Confederates, then, by a similar chain of occurrences and conclusions, Grant was defeated at Belmont. Of the result of thShiloh was a defeat for the Confederates, then, by a similar chain of occurrences and conclusions, Grant was defeated at Belmont. Of the result of the battle, General Grant says: Belmont was severely criticised in the North as a wholly unnecessary battle, barren of results or the possibility of them from the beginning. If it had not been fought, Colonel Oglesby would probably have been captured or destroyed with his three thousand men. Then I should have been culpable indeed.--[ Personal memoirs. ] Soon after the battle of Belmont a painful accident occurred at Columbus by which the commanding general nearly lost his life. During the p
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
ries at Watson's Landing alone and had nearly silenced them when the Pittsburgh came up astern and fired nearly over the Carondelet's upper deck, after she and the Confederates had ceased firing. I reported to General Pope that we had cleared the opposite shores of the enemy, and were ready to cover the crossing of the river and the landing of the army. Seeing themselves cut off, the garrison at Island Number10 surrendered to Foote on the 7th of April, the day of the Confederate repulse at Shiloh. The other Confederates retreating before Pope's advance, were nearly all overtaken and captured at 4 o'clock on the morning of the 8th; and about the same time the cavalry under Colonel W. L. Elliott took possession of the enemy's deserted works on the Tennessee shore. The result of General Pope's operations in connection with the services of the Carondelet below Island Number10 was the capture of three generals (including General W. W. Mackall, who ten days before the surrender had su
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Ellet and his steam-rams at Memphis. (search)
ort entirely deserted; and after planting the National colors upon the ruins of one of the magazines, we sat down to wait for the coming of daylight and the rams. They came, followed by the entire fleet, and after a short stop all proceeded down the river, the rams taking the lead, to Fort Randolph, where they delayed long enough to plant the National flag and to examine the abandoned fortifications, the gunboats at this point taking the advance. The advance of Halleck upon Corinth after Shiloh, and its evacuation on May 30th, gave the Union forces possession of the Memphis and Charleston railroad, broke the second line of Confederate defense, and turned all the positions on the river above Memphis. Fort Pillow and Fort Randolph were thus made untenable (just as Columbus had become untenable after the fall of Forts Henry and Donelson on the Confederate first line of defense) and hence were evacuated.-editors. After leaving Fort Randolph the ram-fleet proceeded without incident
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The battle of Shiloh. (search)
I was in command of all the troops engaged at Shiloh, I was not permitted to see one of the reportsver, about 8 A. M., I found that the attack on Shiloh was unmistakable, and that nothing more than ant. Mount Mcgregor, N. Y., June 21, 1885. Shiloh was a log meeting-house, some two or three milrve. General Smith was Map of the field of Shiloh. The map used with General Grant's article ery ill when the map used with his article, on Shiloh, by The Century Co., was submitted to him. He have been a sad one for the troops engaged at Shiloh. And how near we came to this! On the 6th Sh material service to the gallant men who saved Shiloh on that first day, against large odds. Buell'rcumstances. Some of these critics claim that Shiloh was won when Johnston fell, and that if he hadr. The Confederates fought with courage at Shiloh, but the particular skill claimed I could not,lernand 3, and the Army of the Ohio 20. At Shiloh the effective strength of the Union force on t[13 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Shiloh reviewed. (search)
Shiloh reviewed. Don Carlos Buell, Major-General, U. S. V. Twenty-three years ago the banks ors, and other popular sketches, the subject of Shiloh, from the first hour of the battle to the presy road nearly Map showing the Union camps at Shiloh. Obtained from Gen. W. T. Sherman on the evleft of the line formed Map of the field of Shiloh. Near Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., showing theoutflanking, so common in the Union reports at Shiloh, is not a mere excuse of the inferior commandes in the Hornets' Nest. from the Cyclorama of Shiloh at Chicago. By permission. port Stuart; and tver criticised your map of the battle-field of Shiloh. I have not spoken to Sherman on that particuW. H. L. Wallace's line. From the Cyclorama of Shiloh at Chicago. By permission. ravine which exteer is about five hundred yards east of Shiloh Meeting House, and it was evident that here was to becter. He did good service at Donelson, and at Shiloh on the 7th, and on no other occasion have his [1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Shiloh. (search)
The opposing forces at Shiloh. The composition, losses, and strength of each army as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union army. Army of the Tennessee. Brigadier-103. The grand total of Union loss was 1754 killed, 8408 wounded, and 2885 captured or missing= 13,047. The only official statement of Grant's strength at Shiloh is on page 112, Vol. X., Official Records, which is compiled from division returns of April 4th and 5th, and shows (exclusive of two regiments and one battery nomen brought by Buell to Grant's assistance. General Buell speaks in a general way of 25,000 reenforcements, including Lew Wallace's 5000. General Grant says: At Shiloh, the effective strength of the Union forces on the morning of the 6th was 33,000 men. Lew Wallace brought 5000 more after nightfall. . . . Excluding the troops wh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
Albert Sidney Johnston at Shiloh. for extended treatment of this subject, see The life of General Albert Sidney Johnston, by William Preston Johnston (D. Appleton & Co.), upon which Colonel Johneral Beauregard has claimed that he raised, concentrated, and organized the army which fought at Shiloh; that he persuaded General Johnston to turn aside from a retreat toward Stevenson and join him ae of the blow, one must read the testimony of eye-witnesses. General Bragg says, in a sketch of Shiloh made for the writer: contrary to the views of such as urged an abandonment of the attack, the enell back across a ravine to another strong position behind the Hamburg and Purdy road in rear of Shiloh. Sherman's route of retreat was marked by the thick-strewn corpses of his soldiers. At last, pthe generals and soldiers at the front is at one on all essential points. General Beauregard at Shiloh, two miles in the rear, with the debris of the army surging back upon him, the shells bursting a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
The campaign of Shiloh. Recast and revised from the North American review for January and February, 1886.-editors. G. T. Beauregard, General, C. S. A. On the 22d of January, 1862, Colonel Roger A. Pryor, a member of the Military Committee of the lower branch of the Confederate Congress, visited my headquarters at Centrevied the remains of two of his brigades. Rousseau reached the field by water, at daylight, while two other brigades of the same division The Union gun-boats at Shiloh on the evening of the first day. From a lithograph. (McCook's) were close at hand. Thus, at the instant when the battle was opened we had to face at least 23,000etachment of cavalry was anywhere to be seen as early as 4 P. M. General Breckinridge, with the rear-guard, bivouacked that night not more than two miles from Shiloh. He withdrew three miles farther on the 8th, and there remained for several days without being menaced. Our loss in the two days was heavy, reaching 10,699.
1 2