hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 224 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 172 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 153 117 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 152 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 136 14 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 132 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 86 4 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 80 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 78 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 78 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) or search for Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 113 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In command in Missouri. (search)
erward the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, and myself, and had been referred to me for decision, as having in charge military operations on the Mississippi. On the 31st of July the Secretary of War directed that the 16 nine-inch guns made at Pittsburg for the navy should be forwarded to me with the greatest dispatch, and that 30 thirteen-inch mortars be made as soon as possible and forwarded to me, together with shells for both guns and mortars. On the 24th of August I directed the construclarge ferry-boat, and the Submarine, a powerful snag-boat; they were renamed Essex and Benton. At my suggestion and order, the sides of all these vessels were to be clad with iron. On the 3d of September General Meigs advised me to order from Pittsburg fifteen-inch guns for my gun-boats, as able to empty any battery the enemy could make. Work on these gun-boats was driven forward night and day. As in the case of the fortifications, the work was carried on by torchlight. August 25th an ex
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Marshall and Garfield in eastern Kentucky. (search)
troops among the impoverished mountains. Indeed, Colonel Garfield could not have maintained his position a week, without the aid of the river, by which supplies were brought on steamboats. On the 16th of March, 1862, Garfield with 750 men made an attack on a battalion of Virginia militia, occupying Pound Gap, and drove them away and burned the log-huts built for winter quarters. Soon after this he was ordered to report to General Buell, who had gone to the relief of General Grant at Pittsburg Landing. This he did on the 7th of April, 1862, in time to take part in the second day's contest. General Marshall was born January 13th, 1812, in Frankfort, Ky., and came of a most distinguished family, which included Chief-Justice John Marshall of Virginia, the historian Humphrey Marshall of Kentucky, and the orator and lawyer Thomas F. Marshall. He was four times elected to Congress from the Louisville District, and was Minister to China under President Fillmore. In his profession of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
ptured at 4 o'clock on the morning of the 8th; and about the same time the cavalry under Colonel W. L. Elliott took possession of the enemy's deserted works on the Tennessee shore. The result of General Pope's operations in connection with the services of the Carondelet below Island Number10 was the capture of three generals (including General W. W. Mackall, who ten days before the surrender had succeeded General John P. McCown in the command at Madrid Bend), over The Carondelet and Pittsburgh capturing the Confederate batteries below New Madrid. After a drawing by rear-admiral Walke. 5000 men, 20 pieces of heavy artillery, 7000 stand of arms, and a large quantity of ammunition and provisions, without the loss of a man on our side. On the 12th the Benton (flag-steamer), with the Cincinnati, Mound City, Cairo, and St. Louis, passed Tiptonville and signaled the Carondelet and Pittsburgh to follow. Five Confederate gun-boats came up the next day and offered battle; but after
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The battle of Shiloh. (search)
eneral Halleck moved his headquarters to Pittsburg Landing, and assumed command of the troops in th western bank. I generally spent the day at Pittsburg, and returned by boat to Savannah in the eveI was intending to remove my headquarters to Pittsburg, where I had sent all the troops immediatelyriver, about five miles below (north of) Pittsburg Landing. Here one of General Lew Wallace's threrder General Wallace to march immediately to Pittsburg, by the road nearest the river. Captain Bax the road running from Adamsville to the Pittsburg Landing and Purdy road. These two roads interseent General Wallace orders to move up to Pittsburg Landing, and, naturally, my order was to follow ting-house, some two or three miles from Pittsburg Landing, and on the ridge which divides the watees to take positions to the rear, nearer Pittsburg Landing. When the firing ceased at night, the Nst south of the log-house which stood at Pittsburg Landing, Colonel J. D. Webster, of my staff, had[14 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Shiloh reviewed. (search)
at Savannah, nine miles below (North of) Pittsburg Landing. General Grant's headquarters were inCommanding Officer, advanced forces, near Pittsburg, Tenn., and couched in the following words: PitPittsburgh, Tenn., April 6, 1862. General: The attack on my forces has been very spirited since ear. Airdrie, Kentucky, July 10th, 1885. Pittsburg Landing in the summer of 1884. from a photograptation to reach the front of the army at Pittsburg Landing on Friday, the 4th, and make the attack e important incidents of the battle. Pittsburg Landing is three-quarters of a mile above the mod two-thirds in a straight line south of Pittsburg Landing, and extends north-west 400 yards north d Map of the field of Shiloh. Near Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., showing the positions of the U. loody series of engagements of Sunday at Pittsburg Landing closed with that last repulse. The re Hurlbut's Buell's troops debarking at Pittsburg Landing, Sunday night. left, and I think now th[15 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
rom Grant's force which was concentrating at Pittsburg Landing. General Johnston's arrival incread had taken position on its left bank at Pittsburg Landing. It had been landed by divisions, and Bement of his own and Buell's army. With Pittsburg Landing as a base, this army was to occupy Northt. Indeed, Grant's army was assembled at Pittsburg Landing only one week before Johnston completed ousand--ordered forward to offer battle near Pittsburg. Division from Bethel, main body from Coriville, converging to-morrow near Monterey on Pittsburg. Beauregard second in command, Polk the lefas at Mickey's, within four or five miles of Pittsburg, next morning. But some of the troops did n encountered Stuart's Federal brigade on the Pittsburg and Hamburg road. Stuart was strongly posteands, and he fought down the bank toward Pittsburg Landing. The enemy's left was completely turneda question of retaining, but of gaining, Pittsburg Landing. Complete victory was in his grasp, and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
t so unfavorable a base of operations as Pittsburg Landing rather than at Hamburg, which was reallyhad reached Savannah, twelve miles below Pittsburg Landing, on the east bank of the Tennessee, by tfurther from the enemy's line,--that is, Pittsburg Landing. As the essential point for us, howeveroment to advance and strike the enemy at Pittsburg Landing. Colonel Jordan was then asked to carrynth before General Johnston advanced against Pittsburg is stated, page 522 of Col. Johnston's Life .18-252. M 6-174 L. 28-31 M. 10-69. L. 12--Pittsburg-84 M. 4-111. M. 28-Bethel-156 M. 4-37 M. 205-252 R. 11-169. L 12--Monterey-174. R. 14-Pittsburg. Beauregard, 221 R. 10-132 R. 5-56, M. 14-Po-40,000-ordered forward to offer battle near Pittsburg. Division from Bethel, main body from Corinville, converging to-morrow near Monterey on Pittsburg. Beauregard second in command, Polk the lefa mile asunder, come together two miles from Pittsburg. A road from Purdy, crossing Owl Creek by a[14 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Notes of a Confederate staff-officer at Shiloh. (search)
intype. addressed to General A. S. Johnston, in substance: Now is the time to advance upon Pittsburg Landing. And below were these words, in effect, if not literally: Colonel Jordan had better carry J. Thus did it happen that the Confederate army was brought to undertake the offensive at Pittsburg Landing. Ii. Upon quitting General Bragg's quarters I proceeded immediately to the tent of C's sketch-map of the roads leading from all surrounding quarters to Monterey and thence to Pittsburg Landing, I returned to my office and began to draw up the order for the battle (Special Orders, Not less than two miles from our adversary, was halted and deployed in line of battle across the Pittsburg road to await the arrival and formation in his rear of the rest of the army as prescribed in t general staff and their respective personal staffs, had taken a position, dismounted, on. the Pittsburg road, somewhat to the rear of Hardee's corps. The meeting took place about 4 o'clock. General
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Shiloh battle-order and the withdrawal Sunday . (search)
the Confederate forces, Colonel Jordan, aroused me from sleep in my tent, close by General Beauregard's chamber, and desired me to inform the general at dawn that General Johnston had agreed to his recommendation to move offensively against Pittsburg Landing early that same day, and that the circular orders to the corps commanders had been already issued by Colonel Jordan to that effect. Acting upon this request, I found that General Beauregard had already during the night made full notes on ld Colonel Johnston been present on the field at that last hour of the battle of the 6th, a witness of the actually fruitless efforts made to storm the last position held by the enemy upon the ridge covering the immediate landing-place, known as Pittsburg, he might be better informed why it was that that position was not carried, and be less disposed to adduce such testimony as that of General Bragg, to the effect that but for the order given by Beauregard to withdraw from action he would have c
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The March of Lew Wallace's division to Shiloh. (search)
give my own recollection of the event at Pittsburg Landing. On Sunday, between the hours of 8 and his command at once by the River Road to Pittsburg Landing, and join the army on the right. At theSherman's right on the road leading from Pittsburg Landing to Purdy. Ware to Wallace [1868]. Genins about 2 P. M., and to advance toward Pittsburg Landing in advance of the trains at 4 P. M. Thise lines, as they were established around Pittsburg Landing on Sunday morning, my column started immleading brigade (Ammen) from Savannah to Pittsburg Landing (1:30 to 5). Ammen in his diary dwells owhich I received your order to march, to Pittsburg Landing, and he finds me mistaken in saying we coccurrence grew sharper as I drew nearer Pittsburg Landing. For you must remember, general, that fat Donelson, and twice the second day at Pittsburg Landing you found me with my division under fireng up — viz., the lower or River Road to Pittsburg Landing, was the cause of my movement at noon. I[8 more...]
1 2