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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 388 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 347 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 217 51 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 164 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 153 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 146 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 132 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 128 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 128 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McClellan in West Virginia. (search)
ispatches of the young general, beginning with his first occupation of the country and ending with his congratulations to his troops, in which he announced that they had annihilated two armies, commanded by educated and experienced soldiers, intrenched in mountain fastnesses fortified at their leisure. The country was eager for good news, and took it as literally true. McClellan was the hero of the moment, and when, but a week later, his success was followed by the disaster to McDowell at Bull Run, he seemed pointed out by Providence as the ideal chieftain, who could repair the misfortune and lead our armies to certain victory. His personal intercourse with those about; him was so kindly, and his bearing so modest, that his dispatches, proclamations, and correspondence are a psychological study, more puzzling to those who knew him well than to strangers. Their turgid rhetoric and exaggerated pretense did not seem natural to him. In them he seemed to be composing for stage effect, s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Going to the front: recollections of a private — I. (search)
op, the tailor's shop A militia uniform of 1861.--after the New York seventh's Memorial statue in the central park. The New York seventh marching down Broadway, April 19, 1861. spoken of above, a Bible, a small volume of Shakspere, and writing utensils. To its top was strapped a double woolen blanket and a rubber one. Many other things were left behind because of lack of room in or about the knapsack. It is said by one of the Monticello Guards, that most of its members started for Bull Run with a trunk and an abundant supply of fine linen shirts.-editors. On our arrival in Boston we were marched through the streets — the first march of any consequence we had taken with our knapsacks and equipments. Our dress consisted of a belt about the body, which held a cartridge-box and bayonet, a cross-belt, also a haversack and tin drinking-cup, a canteen, and, last but not least, the knapsack strapped to the back. The straps ran over, around, and about one, in confusion most perp
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McDowell's advance to Bull Run. (search)
s B. Fry, Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. (at Bull Run, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General on Mce Manassas Gap railroad. The stream known as Bull Run, some three miles in front of Manassas, was t Centreville, leads nearly due west, crossing Bull Run at the Stone Bridge. The direct road from Ceavy force. I have fallen back on the line of Bull Run and will make a stand at Mitchell's Ford. Ifniform of the 11th New York (fire Zouaves) at Bull Run. From a photograph. the 11th New York, orhe 18th Outline map of the battle-field of Bull Run. A, A, A, A, A. General line of Confederatthe men trooped back in great disorder across Bull Run. There were some hours of daylight for the Carriages were fired upon, on the road east of Bull Run. Then the panic began, and the bridge over Cdissolved. We moved first northerly, crossed Bull Run below the Sudley Spring Ford, and then bore sreville, on both sides of the road leading to Bull Run. The 29th [New York] regiment stood half a m[25 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing armies at the first Bull Run. (search)
324, vol. II., Official Records) General McDowell says he crossed Bull Run with about eighteen thousand men. I collected information to thatrman's brigades of the four brigades of the First Division crossed Bull Run. The Fifth Division, with Richardson's brigade of the First Diont of Centreville. Some of it was lightly engaged on our side of Bull Run in repelling a feeble advance of the enemy. The Fourth (Reserve) miles in rear of Centreville. That is to say, McDowell crossed Bull Run with 896 officers, 17,676 rank and file, and 24 pieces of artillery. The artillerymen who crossed Bull Run are embraced in the figures of the foregoing table. The guns were as follows: Ricketts's Batteryen howitzers. The artillery, in addition to that which crossed Bull Run, was as follows: Hunt's Battery, 4 12-pounder rifle guns; Carlislel, prepared a statement of the strength of the Confederate army at Bull Run or Manassas, of which the following is a condensation:

So far a

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Incidents of the first Bull Run. (search)
aroused by the sharp, ringing report of a great Parrott gun across Bull Run, two miles away, and the whizzing of a 30-pounder elongated shell ral army seemed to be marching north-westerly on the other side of Bull Run. Halting my men, I rode to the top of the hill, and had a full vixt hill, on which stands the Lewis house, Sherman, who had crossed Bull Run not far above the Stone Bridge at a farm ford, would have had a fanothing of the effect of the artillery playing upon us from beyond Bull Run. When my retiring battery met Jackson, and he assumed command aptain Rogers, I also learn, had a section somewhere lower down on Bull Run with the troops at the fords.--J. D. I. But Heaton and Brockenbrouun battery, and from a high hill was shelling the fugitives beyond Bull Run as they were fleeing in wild disorder to the shelter of the nearesgard's troops were strung out for several miles down the valley of Bull Run, and did not get up to our aid till near the end of the day. Gener
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Responsibilities of the first Bull Run. (search)
hile 6 brigades were to move forward to the Union Mills and Centreville road, there to hold themsell troops could be seen crossing the valley of Bull Run, two miles beyond our left. General McDow long detour to Sudley Ford, where he crossed Bull Run and turned toward Manassas. Colonel Evans, wet, and Jones to hold their brigades south of Bull Run, and ready to move. When Bonham's two regnear me during the day, was directed to cross Bull Run at Ball's Ford, and strike the column on the and Longstreet's brigade (which were nearest Bull Run and the Stone Bridge), by the quickest route had passed the day on the Centreville side of Bull Run made a demonstration on the rear of our rightbrigade was about midway from its camp near Union Mills. He had ridden forward to see the part of fight, General Beauregard would move up from Bull Run and assail the enemy on that side. I rejectethree of the four Federal divisions were near Bull Run, above the turnpike, and the fourth facing ou
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In command in Missouri. (search)
23,00 0 men. This detained me some weeks in New York. Before leaving, I telegraphed to Lieutenant-General Scott, to ask if he had any instructions to give me. He replied that he had none. At Philadelphia we heard the news of the disaster of Bull Run. On the 25th of July I reached St. Louis, and at the start I found myself in an enemy's country, the enemy's flag displayed from houses and recruiting offices. St. Louis was in sympathy with the South, and the State of Missouri was in active rtant part in Missouri. Together with Francis P. Blair, the younger, he had saved Missouri from secession. For this reason I had left his movements to his own discretion, but had myself made every possible effort to reinforce him. The defeat at Bull Run had made a change in affairs from that which was existing when General Lyon left Boonville for Springfield on the 5th of July. To any other officer in his actual situation, I should have issued peremptory orders to fall back upon the railroad a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
e General Johnston's plan, and much useless discussion has arisen from a confusion of the two. But, as General Johnston intended to fight, and did fight, on his own plan as long as he lived, the battle may be considered his until Beauregard's order of retreat, about 5 o'clock Sunday evening, substituted the reconnoissance in force in place of the decisive test of victory or defeat. General Beauregard had been on the ground some six weeks, and his prestige as an engineer and a victor of Bull Run warranted General Johnston in committing to him the elaboration of the details of the march and order of battle. Unfortunately he changed what seems evidently General Johnston's original purpose of an assault by columns of corps into an array in three parallel lines of battle, which produced extreme confusion when the second and third lines advanced to support the first and intermingled with it. Johnston's original plan is summed up in the following dispatch to President Davis: Corinth, A