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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 662 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 188 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 174 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 148 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) or search for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
vernor Frederic Holbrook (1861-3) Governor J. Gregory Smith (1863-5) West Virginia (admitted 1863) Provisional Governor Francis H. Peirpoint (1861-3) Governor Arthur I. Boreman (1863-9) Wisconsin Governor Alexander W. Randall (1857-61) Governor Louis P. Harvey (1861-2) Governor Edward Salomon (1862-3) Governor James T. Lewis (1863-6). Confederate States Alabama Governor Andrew B. Moore (1857-61) Governor John Gill Shorter (1861-3) Governor Thomas H. Watts (1863-5) Arkansas Governor Henry M. Rector (1860-3) Governor Harris Flanagin (1863-4) Governor Isaac Murphy (1864-8) Florida Governor Madison S. Perry (1857-61) Governor John Milton (1861-5) Georgia Governor Joseph E. Brown (1857-65) Louisiana Governor Thomas O. Moore (1860-4) Governor Henry W. Allen (1864-5) Union military governors Governor George F. Shepley (1862-4) Governor Michael Hahn (1864-5) Mississippi Governor John J. Pettus (1860-2)
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
be concentrating a Confederate army in north-western Arkansas for the invasion of Missouri. Lyon woe force which McCulloch was assembling in western Arkansas for the protection of that State and the f and a small escort, hastened rapidly toward Arkansas in order to bring McCulloch to the rescue of st to intercept the Governor's retreat toward Arkansas. Sigel, in executing this plan, had first atle McCulloch went into camp near Maysville in Arkansas. Lyon left Boonville in pursuit of the GoGeneral N. B. Pearce, commanding a brigade of Arkansas State troops, agreed to go along with them. 's regiment and Woodruff's battery, both from Arkansas. His left was met and driven back by McIntosh his mounted men; and called upon Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas to send reinforcements. Hopeful ardered Curtis not to advance any farther into Arkansas; and sent out of Missouri all the troops thatn was on the march across the mountains of North Arkansas toward Jacksonport, Van Dorn was suddenly [2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In command in Missouri. (search)
leave were granted from Washington he would send five regiments made up of river boatmen, well adapted for the Mississippi expedition. In answer to my request they were ordered to me. But the order was changed, and instead of joining me they were sent to General Robert Anderson, then in command at Louisville. The same day I asked Senator Latham, at Washington, to aid my application for three thousand men from California, to be placed at El Paso, to operate against Texas troops moving into Arkansas. On the 5th Marsh reported from Girardeau that the enemy was close upon him, 5000 strong, and would attack him before morning. At midnight a heavy battery of 6 twenty-four-pounders and 1,000 men were embarked to his aid under experienced officers, and Prentiss further reinforced him from below the same morning. On the 6th General Scott telegraphed me that he had ordered all the troops out of New Mexico, and directed me to confer immediately with the governor of Kansas, and arrange for
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Arkansas troops in the battle of Wilson's Creek. (search)
Arkansas troops in the battle of Wilson's Creek. N. B. Pearce, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. I style this short account of my personal recollections of the battle of Oak hills (as the Confederates named the engagement) as above, because I was identified with the State of Arkansas and her soldiers. I also believe that subsequent events, developed by the prominence of some of the commanders ene); Greer's Texas regiment (mounted); Churchill's Arkansas cavalry, and McIntosh's battalion of Arkansas mounted rifles (Lieutenant-Colonel Embry), under the immediate charge of the commanding generalmand of Missouri State Guards, with Bledsoe's and Guibor's batteries, and my three regiments of Arkansas infantry, with Woodruff's and Reid's batteries. More than half the Missourians were mounted, as march upon Lexington, on the 25th of August. A few days after the battle Pearce's brigade of Arkansas militia was disbanded on the expiration of their term of enlistment. General McCulloch moved w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The flanking column at Wilson's Creek. (search)
ed. It was a dark, cloudy night, and a drizzling rain began to fall. So far no news of our movement had reached the enemy's camp, as the cavalry in advance had arrested every person on the road, and put guards before the houses in its neighborhood. At the first dawn of day we continued our advance for about a mile and a half, the cavalry patrols in front capturing forty men who had strolled into our line while looking for food and water, and who said that twenty regiments of Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana troops were encamped not far distant in the valley beyond. Moving on, we suddenly found ourselves near a hill, from which we gained a full view of the camp. We halted a few moments, when I directed four pieces of our artillery to take position on the top of the hill, commanding the camp, while the infantry, with the other two pieces and preceded by Lieutenant Farrand's cavalry company, continued its march down the road to the crossing of Wilson's Creek. It was now 5:30
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
f Missouri, the other (McCulloch) near Keetsville, on the Arkansas line. Although McCulloch was at first averse to venturin himself not strong enough to venture battle, withdrew to Arkansas to seek assistance from McCulloch. We followed him in twa defile of about ten miles in length across the Missouri-Arkansas State line, leading to Elkhorn Tavern, and arrived at Sugntente cordiale between the two champions of Missouri and Arkansas; the two men were too different in their character, educao the defense of the Trans-Mississippi region, especially Arkansas and the Indian Territory, which district had been put undmmand, than to aggressive movements beyond the borders of Arkansas. Price had also had military experience in the Mexican wis and carrying the war into Illinois. Our appearance in Arkansas suddenly changed the situation. Van Dorn at once hasteneerous flank attack and pressure of Hobert's Louisiana and Arkansas infantry, while the brigades of Davis, by striking the le
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Union and Confederate Indians in the civil War. (search)
herokee, Creek, and Seminole nations or tribes, for service in the Indian Territory. These regiments, under General Pike, participated in the battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., on the 7th and 8th of March, 1862. In the five tribes named a battalion and parts of four regiments were raised for the Confederate service, but these amounted irted their influence to get the five tribes committed to the Confederate cause. Occupying territory south of the Arkansas River, and having the secessionists of Arkansas on the east and those of Texas on the south for neighbors, the Choctaws and Chickasaws offered no decided opposition to the scheme. With the Cherokees, the most the Southern States. In June, 1861, Albert Pike, a commissioner of the Confederate States, and General Ben. McCulloch, commanding the Confederate forces in western Arkansas and the Department of Indian Territory, visited Chief Ross with the view of having him make a treaty with the Confederacy. But he declined to make a treaty,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., General Polk and the battle of Belmont. (search)
nd Tyler, he steamed down the Mississippi River toward the same objective point. Smith meanwhile from the direction of Paducah threw forward his column of 2000 men. The mobilization of these various commands, some 12,000 men in all, was duly reported to Polk, and with the report came rumors of the enemy's designs. Polk, however, did not believe that so extensive a movement was directed against Thompson, whose entire force numbered not more than 1,500 men, then encamped far down toward Arkansas. Nor could he think that the plea of preventing the sending of reenforcements to Price was genuine, as he knew that there were no troops then (nor were there likely to be any) in motion to join Price. On the other hand, having for some weeks had every reason to expect a determined effort on Grant's part to dislodge him, he naturally supposed that the looked — for attack was at hand. The force at his disposal, including the garrison of Columbus, was then about 10,000 men of all arms.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Marshall and Garfield in eastern Kentucky. (search)
rshall. On the 10th of September, 1861, General Albert Sidney Johnston, one of the five officers who then held the rank of General in the Confederate army, was assigned to the command of Department No. 2, embracing the States of Tennessee and Arkansas, and that part of the State of Mississippi west of the New Orleans, Jackson and Great Northern and Central Railroad; also, the military operations in Kentucky, Missouri, Kansas, and the Indian country immediately west of Missouri and Arkansas. TArkansas. Tennessee had entered into a league with the Confederacy on the 7th of May, 1861, and although the efforts of the Confederates to take Kentucky out of the Union had been defeated, the State contained a large element friendly to secession, from Confederate private. From a tintype. which was recruited at an early day a number of regiments. In order to afford securer opportunities for such enlistments, it was necessary to make an effort to occupy eastern Kentucky. This was desirable, also, in o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
er cover of their fortifications at Fort Pillow. I was not aware at the time that we were chasing the squadron of my esteemed shipmate of the U. S. Frigates Cumberland and Merrimac, Colonel John W. Dunnington, who afterward fought so bravely at Arkansas Post. On the 14th General Pope's army landed about six miles above Craighead's Point, near Osceola, under the protection of the gun-boats. While he was preparing to attack Fort Pillow, Foote sent his executive officer twice to me on the Car She was run ashore, burned, and blown up. The Confederate ram Sumter was also disabled by our shell and captured. The Bragg soon after shared the same fate and was run ashore, where her officers abandoned her and disappeared in the forests of Arkansas. All the Confederate rams which had been run on the Arkansas shore were captured. The Van Dorn, having a start, alone escaped down the river. The rams The battle of Memphis (June 6, 1862), looking south. After a drawing by rear-admiral Wal
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