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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 78 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 38 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 32 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 22 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863.. You can also browse the collection for White River (Arkansas, United States) or search for White River (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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ral weeks. Bentonville is a small town, and perhaps never contained a population of more than three or four hundred. For agricultural purposes this county is even poorer than McDonald county, Missouri. Considerable tobacco, however, was raised on the small cultivated tracts before the war. The hills around here are not quite so rugged as along Elk river and Sugar Creek some twenty miles northeast of us. Yesterday morning, March 1st, Colonel Phillips sent a scout in the direction of White river, almost east of this place, for the purpose of discovering a party of rebels reported to have been seen in that vicinity a few days ago; but it returned about midnight without having found them. Our cavalry will probably be kept busy for awhile in endeavoring to free this section from bushwhackers, for they have had almost full sway since we passed through here last October, just before the battle of Old Fort Wayne. When we came here, only three days ago, the dust raised by their horse
fort that was constructed there during the winter, as a temporary defence, has been destroyed. As we exhausted that section of forage and commissary supplies before leaving it, it will now hardly afford any special attractions for guerrillas to return to until spring shall bring grass sufficient for grazing purposes. This evening (14th) a train of upwards of one hundred wagons came in, loaded principally with corn. The corn and forage thus brought in was obtained in the vicinity of White River, east of here, and the expedition has been absent five days. This forage will afford great relief to many of our hungry animals that have been rapidly losing flesh of late on account of short rations. In a good many instances, horses that have been fastened to young trees, have gnawed the bark therefrom as high as they could reach, so keenly have they felt the pinch of hunger. I have seen some horses, too, that have even lost their manes and tails by their fellows chewing them in the ab
s to exchange. They would not hesitate to exchange an old and inferior musket for one of our best new patterns. If they can afford to weaken their own cause by pride, we surely need not regret it. They are too blind to see that they are fluttering around the lamp of their own destruction. A dispatch from Springfield, Missouri, of the 6th instant, states that General Marmaduke, with a force of about two thousand men and several pieces of artillery, was, on the 3d instant, encamped on White River in Arkansas, near the southern line of Missouri. It is believed that he either intends to make a raid on Springfield, or to endeavor to capture our supply trains en route between that place and Fort Smith. There are, probably, nearly three thousand State troops in southwest Missouri, and should he invade the State, they will likely soon to be able to check his movements, and put him to flight. The energy with which they pressed General Shelby last October, and their success in capturi