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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 38 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 33 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 32 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 24 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 18 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 14 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 11 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War.. You can also browse the collection for Kautz or search for Kautz in all documents.

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which almost proved fatal; the hard conflicts of the Wilderness, when General Grant came over in May, 1864; the fighting on the north bank of the Po, and on the left of the army at Spotsylvania Court-House; the various campaigns against Sheridan, Kautz, Wilson, and the later cavalry leaders on the Federal side, when, Stuart having fallen, Hampton commanded the whole Virginia cavalry; the hot fights at Trevillian's, at Reanis, at Bellfield, in a hundred places, when, in those expiring hours of trther attempt to enter Richmond. Then came the long, hard, desperate fighting of the whole year 1864, and the spring of 1865. At Trevillian's, Sheridan was driven back and Charlottesville saved; on the Weldon railroad the Federal cavalry, under Kautz and Wilson, was nearly cut to pieces, and broke in disorder, leaving on the roads their wagons, cannons, ambulances, their dead men and horses; near Bellfield the Federal column sent to destroy the railroad was encountered, stubbornly opposed, a
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., A family rifle-pit: an incident of Wilson's raid (search)
ted in remaining despite every effort made to oust him, the Federal commander organized an enormous raid against the Southside and the Danville railroads, by which Lee was supplied. The result of this cavalry movement is known. Generals Wilson, Kautz, and others who commanded in the expedition, were successful in their object, so far as the destruction of a large part of the railroads went; but when they attempted to return to their infantry lines, below Petersburg, they came to grief. Hampt carriages, with the spokes hacked hastily to pieces, and the guns dismounted. But these results of combat — of retreat and pursuit --are familiar to the reader, doubtless, and not of very great interest to the present writer. The Wilson and Kautz raid would indeed have been forgotten long ago by him, but for the family rifle-pit mentioned above, and to this the attention of the worthy reader is now requested. I heard all about it from a very charming lady who resided in a little house