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carrying everything before him. To meet the attack of their formidable adversary, the authorities at Washington sent to hurry forward the forces of General Hunter from the Ohio, and a considerable force from General Grant's army was dispatched up the bay to man the fortifications. Early had pressed on, crossed the Potomac, advanced to Frederick City, defeated General Wallace at the Monocacy, and was now in sight of the defences of Washington; the crack of his skirmishers was heard at the White house and in the department buildings of the capital. The enormous march, however, had broken down and decimated his army. The five hundred miles of incessant advance, at twenty miles a day, left him only eight thousand infantry, about forty field-pieces, and two thousand badly mounted cavalry-at the moment detached against the railroads northward — with which to assault the powerful works, bristling with cannon, in his front. His position at this moment was certainly critical, and calculate
of the Peninsula, his Blakely was as a sentinel on post near the enemy; and at the battle of Williamsburg his courage and skill transformed raw militia into veterans. In the seven days battles around Richmond he won fadeless laurels. With one Napoleon, he engaged three heavy batteries, and fought them with a pertinacity and unfaltering nerve which made the calm face of Jackson glow; and the pressure of that heroic hand, warm and eloquent of unspoken admiration. Soon afterwards, at the White house, he engaged a gunboat, and driving it away, after a brief but hot encounter, proved how fanciful were the terrors of these monsters. His greatest achievements were to come, however; and he hastened to record them on the enduring tablets of history. From the moment when his artillery advanced from the Rappahannock, to the time when it returned thither, to the day of Fredericksburg, the path of the young leader was deluged with the blood of battle. At Manassas he rushed his guns into t
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Hardeman Stuart: the young Captain of the signal corps. (search)
rdent and complete performance of all duties assigned to him. He courted danger with a boyish gaiety which shone in his dancing eyes and on his smiling lips, and seemed to covet opportunities of exposing himself to the heaviest fire, in the thickest portion of the fight. No bullet touched him, however; the shot and shell, bursting and plunging everywhere, seemed determined to avoid him and do him no harm. He came out of the battle gay, laughing, and unharmed as he had entered it. At the White house, afterward, he went with Pelham in that boyish frolic, the chase of the gunboats, and then we rode back all a summer's day to the banks of the Chickahominy, conversing. The delightful gaiety of the boy made the long, hot miles of sandy highway slip away unseen; and here I first obtained an insight into the character of the noble young Mississippian, before a stranger, but to be to me from that moment a valued friend. His gallantry during the battle had attracted attention, and he now
rdent and complete performance of all duties assigned to him. He courted danger with a boyish gaiety which shone in his dancing eyes and on his smiling lips, and seemed to covet opportunities of exposing himself to the heaviest fire, in the thickest portion of the fight. No bullet touched him, however; the shot and shell, bursting and plunging everywhere, seemed determined to avoid him and do him no harm. He came out of the battle gay, laughing, and unharmed as he had entered it. At the White house, afterward, he went with Pelham in that boyish frolic, the chase of the gunboats, and then we rode back all a summer's day to the banks of the Chickahominy, conversing. The delightful gaiety of the boy made the long, hot miles of sandy highway slip away unseen; and here I first obtained an insight into the character of the noble young Mississippian, before a stranger, but to be to me from that moment a valued friend. His gallantry during the battle had attracted attention, and he now
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Stuart's ride around McClellan in June, 1862. (search)
ady trot now, with drawn sabres and carbines ready, the cavalry, followed by the horse-artillery, which was not used during the whole expedition, approached Tunstall's Station on the York River railroad, the enemy's direct line of communication with his base of supplies at the White house. Everywhere the ride was crowded with iWhite house. Everywhere the ride was crowded with incident. The scouting and flanking parties constantly picked up stragglers, and overhauled unsuspecting wagons filled with the most tempting stores. In this manner a wagon, stocked with champagne and every variety of wines, belonging to a General of the Federal army, fell a prey to the thirsty gray-backs. Still they pressed on. nster bent upon escape, and in an instant it had disappeared. Stuart then reflected for a single moment. The question was, should he go back and attack the White House, where enormous stores were piled up? It was tempting, and he afterwards told me he could scarcely resist it. But a considerable force of infantry was posted t
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Roslyn and the White house: before and after. (search)
arbour, and I was going with a few companions toward the White House, whither the cavalry had preceded us. I thought I knew t to Locksley Hall, and I was soon en route again for the White House. This was McClellan's great depot of stores on the Pe of base, if you prefer the phrase, reader --and to the White House General Stuart had hurried to prevent if possible the de culminate. Strange moment for my first visit to the White House! to a spot which I had seen often in fancy, but never bnd diamonds, was played still in the eyes of fancy! The White House had been to the present writer an honest old Virginia mak them the heaviest blow. The officer commanding at the White House had promptly obeyed the orders sent him, and the nascenty the side of Destruction. Such was the scene at the White House on that June day of 1862; in this black cloud went down who destroys in order to destroy. But let that pass. Since that time I have never revisited Roslyn or the White House.