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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The siege of Morris Island. (search)
The assault was delayed until the next day, when we were repulsed with considerable loss. While these operations were going on, a division of troops was sent over to James Island to engage the enemy's attention in that direction, where a spirited action was fought on the 16th of July, in which the Federal forces were victorious. The failure of the attack on the 11th satisfied General Gillmore that siege operations must be commenced against Wagner. Ground was broken on the night of the 13th, and the work was pushed with such vigor that the first parallel, at the distance of thirteen hundred and fifty yards, was completed on the 17th. It mounted twenty-five rifled guns and mortars. An assault was arranged for twilight the next evening, and two additional brigades were added to our forces. During the day our batteries, in conjunction with the navy, kept up a warm cannonade on the fort, and by 4 P. M. the enemy's guns were silenced. The troops chosen for the assault were the br
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Vicksburg during the siege. (search)
te the 12th, and beginning: The enemy is apparently moving in heavy force toward Edwards' Depot, on Southern Railroad. The movable army of Pemberton, consisting of the divisions of Bowen and Loring, which had come up from Grand Gulf, and Stevenson, who was detached from the garrison of Vicksburg, leaving the two divisions of Forney and M. L. Smith in loco, was now at Edwards' Depot, eighteen miles east of Vicksburg; and headquarters were at Bovina, a station some four miles west. On the 13th, General Johnston sent a dispatch to the War Department in these words: I arrived this evening, finding the enemy in force between this place and General Pemberton. I am too late. These were ominous words. Through Captain Yerger he dispatched that order to General Pemberton which has been the bone of contention in all the subsequent discussions on the responsibility of failure. It directed the latter to come up, if practicable, on the rear of McPherson at Clinton at once. All the strength
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Meade at Gettysburg. (search)
port, on the Potomac. He was closely followed by Meade, who came up with him on the 12th, and who found him in a position naturally almost impregnable, and strongly fortified. Meade's impulse was to attack at once, but, after consultation with his corps commanders, he abstained from ordering an assault until he could more fully reconnoitre the enemy's position. On the morning of the 14th, a reconnoissance in force, supported by the whole army, was made at daylight; but, on the night of the 13th, Lee had recrossed the Potomac. There was a great deal of clamor at the time, because Meade did not destroy or capture Lee's army at Williamsport; but Meade, conscious that he had acted wisely, always felt that history would do him justice. Had he assaulted, he would certainly have been defeated, and the result would have been disastrous not only to the army, but to the country, for a defeat to our army there would have opened the road to Washington and the North, and all the fruits of Gett
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First shot against the flag. (search)
intervals of fifteen minutes. It was estimated that over twenty-five hundred shot and shell struck the fort during the first twenty-four hours. By morning, the fleet sent to our assistance appeared off the bar, but did not enter. At 8.30 on the 13th, the quarters took fire, from the effect of hot shot, and could not be extinguished, and soon the entire barracks were in a blaze. The barrels containing powder were thrown into the sea. At 1.20 on the 13th, the flagstaff, having been struck four13th, the flagstaff, having been struck four times, was shot away, and the flag replaced upon the parapet. The firing upon the work was severe and continued; the return from the fort slow and feeble, sounding like signals of distress to the nation, and, finally, ceased altogether. Seeing the condition of things, a Colonel Wigfall pushed out in an open boat from Cumming's Point-unauthorized it is true-and, learning from Major Anderson that he would evacuate the fort upon the terms originally proposed to him, returned and communicated wit
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
f our wagons. Upon the receipt of this intelligence General Lee ordered me to march as rapidly as possible to the relief of our trains. By a forced march we succeeded in clearing the road, and reached Williamsport in time to save our supply trains. We then took position covering the crossing there and at Falling Water, a short distance below. As the other corps arrived they were assigned positions, and we went to work as rapidly as possible to strengthen our line with field works. On the 13th, General Lee informed me that the river had fallen sufficiently at Williamsport to allow us to ford, and that the bridge at Falling Water had been repaired, and that he would, that night, recross the river with his entire army. I suggested, as a matter of convenience, and to avoid confusion, that it might be better to pass the trains over that night, with everything not essential to battle, and let his troops remain in position until the night of the 14th; that, if the rest of his line was a
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
s were prepared, have not been extended sufficiently far to the east to cover the field of the operations, though an equivalent quantity of country to the west, upon which no events of consequence occurred, has been included. Since this article was first published, the following letter has been received which, in justice to Mr. Bachelder, is now given in full: office of the Chief of engineers, Washington, D. C., December 10th, 1878. Colonel William Brooke-Rawle, Sir-Your letter of 13th ultimo, transmitting an account of the operations of the cavalry command of General David McM. Gregg during the battle of Gettysburg, was referred to Mr. John B. Bachelder, who was employed by the War Department to plot the positions of the troops on the maps of Gettysburg battlefield, and has been returned endorsed as follows: In answer to the letter of Mr. William Brooke-Rawle, I have the honor to say that it is to be regretted that from the removed position of the field of operations of
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Confederate negro enlistments. (search)
ing the negroes, those of States not overrun for the contrary policy. These propositions were duly referred, and I find that the subject was actively discussed in secret session of both houses on the 4th, 6th, 7th, and 8th. On the 9th, the Senate rejected Senator Brown's enlistment proposition. On the 11th of February there was a great public meeting in Richmond, at which Secretary Benjamin and Senator Henry both spoke in zealous and earnest advocacy of the enlistment programme, and on the 13th, there were two new bills introduced by Mr. Oldham, of Texas, and Mr. Barksdale, of Mississippi, looking to negro enlistments. Senator Oldham's bill was offered in the Senate, and was not heard of again. In the House, a motion to reject Barksdale's bill was defeated by a two-thirds vote. This bill provided for the enlistment of slaves by their masters, and did not reward them with their freedom for volunteering — in fact, there was no volunteering about it. They were to be sent to fight th
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
of one hundred thousand dollars for the capture of Davis. This proclamation had been received and promulgated on the 9t;h, and hence the officers in the pursuit of Davis were in no way inspired by the promise which it contained. They performed their part from a higher sense of duty, and too much praise cannot be awarded to Colonels Pritchard and Harnden, or to the officers and men of their regiments who participated in the pursuit. Colonel Pritchard arrived at Macon on the afternoon of the 13th, and reported at once, with his prisoners, at corps headquarters. When the cavalcade reached the city, the streets were thronged by crowds of rebel citizens, but not one kind greeting was extended to the deserted chieftain or his party. A good dinner was prepared and given to them by my servants, and, after three or four hours rest, they were sent, under strong escort, toward the North, by way of Atlanta, Augusta, and Savannah, arrangements for which had been already made, in pursuance of o