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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 179 35 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 85 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 65 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 47 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 46 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 45 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 39 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Cheatham or search for Cheatham in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of Shiloh. (search)
ome importance, in a military view, by the Confederates, for after the fall of Donelson they erected a battery on the high bluff overlooking the landing, and General Cheatham occupied Shiloh as a military camp. The country is undulating table-land, the bluffs rising to the height of one hundred and fifty feet above the alluviahousand men, and constituted the fighting material of the Confederate army, commanded by the most experienced officers-Johnston, Beauregard, Bragg, Hardee, Polk, Cheatham, Breckenridge-and a long list of subordinate commanders, presenting an array of names that ought to infuse confidence in any army. With their united forces it w God's first temples. The church at Shiloh had two doors and one window, which was without glass. Of pulpit and seats none were visible, as the Confederate General Cheatham had removed them for camp use previous to our occupancy. Before the battle the flooring boards were being rapidly converted into coffins for Union soldiers.