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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Reynolds' last battle. (search)
thstood the shock of attack quite without support and literally in air, that is, with no troops or even natural or artificial cover to protect their exposed flank, to the extreme right, where the Eleventh Corps was at last put in position, the First Corps was deployed in thin ranks. Reynolds had counted on having the Third Corps well in hand to extend his line to the left, but it was late in starting, late in moving, lost its way and got far out into the hostile lines, and got back only by Humphrey's skill and readiness, and long before they were on the field, Reynolds' dead body was on its way to a place of safety. While the battle waged in the woods in front of the Seminary, and the overwhelming forces came out from behind the ridges that had sheltered them from sight, Reynolds' aides and messengers were busy bringing to Meade news of the conflict, looking for Howard to urge forward his corps, and hunting up Sickles to put him on the right road. Buford was busy, too, in making
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Meade at Gettysburg. (search)
, but with the loss of nearly one-half of his division. At length, when the enemy made a last furious charge on the crest, they were met by fresh troops, which had been sent by General Meade from other portions of the line, and were repulsed. General Meade, during this encounter, brought forward in person a brigade of the Twelfth Corps, and in the early part of the action his horse was shot under him. Finally, about sunset, a counter charge was made by our troops, in which the remnants of Humphrey's Division joined, and had the satisfaction of bringing back the guns they had previously lost. The division of Regulars, under General Ayres, led the assault on the right of the Fifth Corps, and pressed the enemy on the centre, but on the left they were outflanked and driven back. General Sykes at once ordered forward the Pennsylvania Reserves, who, led by General Crawford, made a gallant charge, and, after a sharp contest, the enemy retired. This ended the action on our left, but at ei
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), On the field of Fredericksburg. (search)
be carried to-night. Hooker remonstrated, begged, obeyed. In the army to hear is to obey. He prepared to charge with Humphrey's Division; he brought up every available battery in the city. I proceeded, he said, against their barriers as I would until sunset. He made no impression upon their works, no more than you could make upon the side of a mountain of rock. Humphrey's Division formed under shelter of the rise, in column, for assault. They were directed to make the attack with empty mor twenty yards of the stone wall. Hooker afterward said: No campaign in the world ever saw a more gallant advance than Humphrey's men made there. But they were put to do a work that no men could do. In a moment they were hurled back with enormousrd Heights, where Burnside would after awhile hold his council of war. The shattered regiments of Tyler's Brigade of Humphrey's Division were assembled under cover of the bank where they had formed for the charge. A colonel rode about through th
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
the charge, he thought there was some mistake, and retired to a captured battery, near the swale between the two ridges, where he halted, and, when ordered to retire to the new line a second time, he did so under protest. The troops engaged with me in the fight of the 2d were mostly Georgians, as follows: The four Georgia brigades of Generals Benning, Anderson, Wofford, and Semmes, General Kershaw's South Carolina Brigade, General Law's Alabama Brigade, General Barksdale's (afterward General Humphrey's) Mississippi Brigade, and General Robertson's Texas Brigade. Our men had no thought of retreat. They broke every line they encountered When the order to withdraw was given, a courier was sent to General Lee, informing him of the result of the day's work. Before pursuing this narrative further, I shall say a word or two concerning this assault. I am satisfied that my force, numbering hardly thirteen thousand men, encountered during that three and a half hours of bloody work not l