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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Fire, sword, and the halter. (search)
Fire, sword, and the halter. General J. D. Imboden. The years 1862 and 1864 were the most eventful of the war in the Shenandoah Valley. During the spring of the first, Stonewall Jackson made his famous twenty-eight days campaign, with 13,000 men, against Generals Milroy, Banks, Fremont and Shields, driving them all out of the valley, with their aggregate forces of about 64,000 men. In 1864 the Federal operations were conducted successively by Generals Sigel, Hunter and Sheridan, when that splendid valley was desolated and scourged with fire and sword. It is proposed in this paper merely to give some account of General David Hunter's performances during his brief command in June and July, 1864, of the Federal forces in the Valley, and to lay before the people of this country, and especially of the Northern States, some facts that may explain why here and there are still found traces of bitter feeling in many a household in the South, not against the government of the United Sta
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Morale of General Lee's army. (search)
it, has absolutely no parallel in all history. Our noble old chief (General Lee) was a Christian, not merely in profession, but in reality, and did everything in his power to promote the moral and spiritual welfare of his army. The piety of Stonewall Jackson is as historic as his splendid military achievements, and the influence which he exerted for the religious good of his officers and men can never be fully known in this world. These noble leaders had at the first the co-operation of sur joined in with the fervor of one who had but recently felt the preciousness of a new-born faith in Christ, and it was a solemn and impressive scene to all. In the great battle which followed, the next day, Colonel Baylor, with the flag of the Stonewall Brigade in his hands, and the shout of victory on his lips, fell, leading a splendid charge, and gave his noble life to the cause he loved so well. Hard by, and about the same moment, Captain White was shot down, while behaving with most consp
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson and his men. (search)
gainst the torrent which beat upon them; and, finally, in a voice which rivaled the roar of battle, he cried out: Oh, men, there are Jackson and his Virginians standing behind you like a stone wall.1 Uttering these words of martial baptism, Bee fell dead upon the field, and left behind him a fame which will follow that of Jackson as a shadow. It would be but the repetition of history to mention, at length, the movements of Jackson's Brigade that day. It was Bee who gave him the name of Stonewall, but it was his own Virginians who made that name immortal. This brigade checked the victorious tide of battle, but to turn it back was no easy labor. Around the Henry House and its plateau the contest raged with renewed violence and vacillating success for an hour; and then Jackson led his men in their last bayonet charge, and pierced the enemy's centre. The timely arrival of Kirby Smith and Early upon their flank, finished the work, and defeat was turned into a rout. General Jackson
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Stuart in camp and field. (search)
hed under shelter of a pine thicket, and his horses picketed near — for he believed that exposure hardened them — with a slender little Whitworth gun posted like a graceful watch-dog in front, and surrounded by his mirthful young staff officers, Stuart passed the long months of the winter succeeding the hard battle. Jackson's quarters were at Moss neck, some miles down the river, and they exchanged visits often-Stuart making merry over all things, and not sparing even the grave and devout Stonewall, whose eyes would twinkle at his companion's jests. Jesting, indeed, seemed to be a necessity of Stuart's nature. Mirth and humor burst forth from this strong nature as a flower bursts from its stalk. At Camp no camp the days and nights were full of song and laughter. Stuart's delight was to have his banjo-player, Sweeney, in his tent; and even while busily engaged in his official correspondence, he loved to hear the gay rattle of the instrument, and the voice of Sweeney singing J'ine