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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Flight and capture of Jefferson Davis. (search)
chives and public property away from Richmond by the proper department officers, the statement is correct; but if it is meant by this insidious form of a statement to be understood that this or any other public money was taken from Richmond in Mr. Davis' baggage, then the statement is wholly untrue. It is also said in this paper, when speaking of the train which carried Mr. Davis and other officers from Richmond, that, This train, it is said, was one which had carried provisions to Amelia Court-House for Lee's hard-pressed and hungry army, and having been ordered to Richmond, had taken these supplies to that place, where they were abandoned for a more ignoble freight. This whole paragraph is ridiculously absurd. No supplies were then being carried from the South toward Richmond — I mean after Lee's retreat began. And it was a train of passenger, and not of freight cars, which carried the persons referred to, and was provided for the express purpose of carrying them off. General
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Dalton-Atlanta operations. (search)
ubsequent. On page 49, General Sherman claims that the strength of the country, by mountains, streams, and forests, gave his enemy a fair offset to his numerical superiority. Between Dalton and Atlanta, one sees but two semblances of mountains-Rocky Face, which covered the march by which he flanked Dalton and Kenesaw, less than two miles long. The country was no more unfavorable for the offensive than the Wilderness, or that on which Lee and McClellan fought near Richmond, or that between Amelia and Appomattox Court-Houses. General Sherman certainly executed his plan of operations with great perseverance, skill, and resolution. But it is a question if that plan was the best. The results obtained, compared with those attainable, indicate that it was not. At Dalton, only the southern left flank was covered by Rocky Face, not its front; and an attack in front would have been on ground as favorable to the Federal army as its general could have hoped to find. With odds of near ten
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
eave Mr. Reagan and Mr. Davis to reconcile with the facts. The.declaration is explicit that Mr. Davis had insisted in reserving it (the gold) for exigencies, and it was now secured in his baggage. and under cover of darkness the President of the Confederacy, accompanied by three members of his Cabinet-Breckenridge, Benjamin, and Reagan-drove rapidly to the train which had been prepared to carry them from Richmond. This train, it is said, was the one which had carried provisions to Amelia Court-House for Lee's hard-pressed and hungry army; and, having been ordered to Richmond, had taken those supplies to that place, where they were abandoned for a more ignoble freight. This statement rests upon newspaper report, which I have not time to verify. As a matter of course, the starving rebel soldiers suffered, but Davis succeeded in reaching Danville in safety, where he rapidly recovered from the fright he had sustained, and astonished his followers by a proclamation as bombastic and