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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 103 27 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 9 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 46 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 40 4 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 40 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 33 13 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 22 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) or search for Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 3 document sections:

The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Flight and capture of Jefferson Davis. (search)
nt to Greensboroa, North Carolina, where they remained a week or two. It was after we had left Greensboroa for Charlotte, North Carolina, and had gone as far as Lexington, in that State, that Mr. Davis received a dispatch from General Johnston, req would terminate in forty-eight hours, leaving the parties bound by its terms until the 26th of April. Mr. Davis was at Charlotte when the treaty and armistice was agreed to. He remained there under the terms of the armistice until the notice of its me on the 23d of April, from a citizen, now a prominent lawyer and politician of Georgia, who had seen him at Charlotte, North Carolina, only three or four days before, and had learned that he was on his way, with a train and escort of cavalry, to the south. This citizen may have seen Mr. Davis at the time named at Charlotte. But if he did, he saw him halted there, awaiting the result of the negotiations with General Sherman, and afterward the termination of the armistice, until the 27th o
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
gilant watch for Davis and other members of the rebel government. The first direct information of Davis' movements reached me on the 23d of April, from a citizen, now a prominent lawyer and politician in Georgia, who had seen him at Charlotte, North Carolina, only three or four days before, and had learned that he was on his way, with a train and an escort of cavalry, to the South, intending, as was then understood, to go to the Trans-Mississippi Department. This information was regarded ath detachments and scouts well out in all directions to the front and rear. With vigilance on the part of the troops, it is difficult to perceive how Davis and his party could possibly have hoped to escape. From the time they were reported at Charlotte till their capture, we were kept informed of their general movements, and were enabled thereby to dispose of our forces in such a manner as to render the capture morally certain. Rumors came in from all directions, but by carefully weighing th
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson and his men. (search)
nia; but it is said the loyalty of the old gentleman was not proof against the pride he felt in his famous son-in-law. Major Jackson's wife soon died. He then married a daughter of Rev. Dr. Morrison, another Presbyterian clergyman, of Charlotte, North Carolina. She now lives in Charlotte, with her only child, Julia, who was not six months old when her father died at Chancellorsville. In 1857 Major Jackson went to Europe. While in France, he rode on horseback, with some French officers, oveCharlotte, with her only child, Julia, who was not six months old when her father died at Chancellorsville. In 1857 Major Jackson went to Europe. While in France, he rode on horseback, with some French officers, over the field of Waterloo. It is said he seemed perfectly familiar with the topography of the ground and the maneuvres of the two armies, and sharply criticised one of the Emperor's movements, by saying, There's where Napoleon blundered. Such presumption was unheard of since the time the young Corsican, in Italy, criticised the venerable Wurmser. But what seemed effrontery in Bonaparte was genius in Napoleon, and the name of Stonewall will save his criticism. After his return from Europe,