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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 171 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 163 47 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 97 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 97 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 42 6 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 40 6 Browse Search
William A. Crafts, Life of Ulysses S. Grant: His Boyhood, Campaigns, and Services, Military and Civil. 37 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 33 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 32 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 29 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death.. You can also browse the collection for Buell or search for Buell in all documents.

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r channels, and would have been obliged to abandon its lines and leave Richmond an easy prey. Meanwhile the North had collected large and splendidly-equipped armies of western men in Kentucky and Tennessee, under command of Generals Grant and Buell. The new Federal patent, the Cordon, was about to be applied in earnest. Its coils had already been unpleasantly felt on the Atlantic seaboard; General Butler had flashed his battle blade --that was to gleam, afterward, so bright at Fort Fisher and Dutch Gap-and had prepared an invincible armada for the capture of New Orleans; and simultaneously the armies under Buell were to penetrate into Tennessee and divide the systems of communication between Richmond and the South and West. General Albert Sidney Johnston was sent to meet these preparations, with all the men that could be spared from Western Virginia and the points adjacent to his line of operations. Still his force was very inadequate in numbers and appointment; while to
,000 fresh and well-equipped soldiers, had been facing General A. S. Johnston, seeking to amuse him until a junction with Buell could surely crush his small force — not aggregating 30,000 effective men. To frustrate this intent, Johnston advanced tonboats. Here Grant waited the onset, with almost the certainty of annihilation. But the onset never came; that night Buell crossed upward of 20,000 fresh troops; the broken army of Grant was reformed; Wallace's division of it joined the main boto this, it was claimed that he relied on the information of a most trusty scoutnone other than Colonel John Morgan--that Buell's advance could not possibly reach the river within twenty-four hours. Of course, in that event, it was far better genera view; and the more reasonable theory came to be accepted — that he desired to strike Grant before the heavy columns that Buell was pouring down could join him. At al events, the sad waste of position and opportunity, and the heavy loss in brill
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death., Chapter 24: echo of Seven days, North and South. (search)
oward more rapid completion. These designs were to hold the State of Kentucky by the army under Buell, wrest from the South the possession of Tennessee and Alabama--as a base for attack upon Georgianati, would leave the main army free to march upon Louisville before re-enforcements could reach Buell. With this view General Kirby Smith, with all the troops that could be spared-ill clad, badly enfederates were in full march for the enemy; that any moment might bring news of the crushing of Buell before re-enforcements, or fresh supplies, could reach him. Great was the disappointment, therefvy loss upon both sides, but not productive of any result; for, after the victory, Bragg allowed Buell to escape from his front and retire at his will toward the Ohio. That a Confederate army, at lethe great disparity of numbers, the vim of the barefooted boys prevailed against the veterans of Buell's army, under General G. W. Thomas. They gained a decided advantage over three times their numb