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of commissary stores, for which there was no transportation. But, Joe Johnston held the movement to be necessary; and, by this time the South had learned to accept that what he thought must be correct. The great disparity in numbers, and the evident purpose of the Federals to make Richmond the focal point of attack, spoke plainly to that perfect soldier the necessity-coute que coute-of bringing his army within easy striking distance of the Capital. Stonewall Jackson — with Ewell's and Early's divisions of less than ten thousand men of all arms — was detached to watch the enemy and the retrograde movement was completed so successfully that McClellan never suspected the evacuation. Two days later, his grand array-an army with banners, bands braying anti new arms glinting in the sun-moved down to the attack; and then, doubtless to his infinite digust, he found only the smoking and deserted debris of the Confederate camp. The army he had hoped to annihilate was on its steady and
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death., Chapter 24: echo of Seven days, North and South. (search)
end of July, sent Stonewall Jackson — with Ewell's, A. P. Hill's, and his own old division under General Charles S. Winder, in all about 10,000 men — to frustrate the flatulent designs of the gong-sounding commander, whose Chinese warfare was echoing so loudly from the frontier. Cautious, rapid and tireless as ever, Jackson advanced into Culpeper county; and on the 9th of August gave the gong-sounder his first lesson on the field of Cedar Mountain. Throwing a portion of his force under Early on the enemy's flank and bringing Ewell and, later, Winder against his front, Jackson forced him from his position after a bloody fight, which the advance of A. P. Hill turned into a complete victory. Cedar Mountain was a sharp and well-contested fight; but the Confederates inflicted a loss five times their own, held the field, and captured a number of prisoners and guns. General Winder led his troops gallantly to the charge, but just at the moment of collision he was struck and mortal
, then, that Richmond heard that Ewell had crossed the Potomac at Williamsport, pushed on through Hagerstown and, leaving Early at York, had passed to Carlisle; that Longstreet had followed him at Williamsport; and that A. P. Hill had crossed at She Wild was the alarm in the North when the rebel advance had, penetrated the heart of Pennsylvania; when York was held by Early and laid under contribution and Harrisburg was threatened by Ewell. The whole North rose in its might. Governors Seymouing him from line after line of works and holding every inch gained, by dogged valor and perseverance. Hays and Hoke (of Early's) advance into the ploughing fire of the rifled guns-march steadily on and charge over their own dead and dying, straigh gates in future; happy could we beat it thence, baffled and crushed as ever before. For the short, sharp raid of General Early-penetrating to the gates of the Capital and with possible capabilities of even entering them-can hardly be considered