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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death.. You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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alk, pro or con, begins to grow more popular. One day I find, per card, that the Patagonian Ambassador dines me at seven. As it is not a state dinner I go, to find it even more stupid. At dessert the reserve wears off and all soon get deep in the Star of the West episode. Looks mighty bad now, sir. Something must be done, sir, and soon, too, says Diggs, a hard-working M. C. from the North-west. But, as yet, I don't see-what, exactly! Will your government use force to supply Fort Sumter? asks Count B., of the Sardinian legation. If so, it might surely drive out those states so doubtful now, that they may not go to extremes, suggested the Prussian charge ad interim. Why, they'll be whipped back by the army and navy within ninety days from date, remarks a gentleman connected with pension brokerage. If part of the army and navy does not go to get whipped with them, growls an old major of the famed Aztec Club. And the scar across the nose, that he brought awa
place wind vs. Work what people said of the Solons the New Cabinet heads of departments sketched the President's advisers popular opinion the first gun at Sumter. The proposition that, shown who writes the ballads of a country, one may tell who makes its laws, is far from reversible in many instances; and assuredly the omery, when on the 10th of April, Governor Pickens, of South Carolina, telegraphed that the Government at Washington had notified him of its intention to supply Fort Sumter-Peaceably if we can; forcibly if we must. Bulletins were posted before the Exchange, the newspaper office and the Government House; and for two days there waue. Then the news flashed over the wires that, on the morning of the 12th of April, Beauregard had opened the ball in earnest, by commencing the bombardment of Fort Sumter. This caused the excitement to go up to fever heat; and the echo of that first gun made every heart in the breadth of the land bound with quickened throb. Bus
Chapter 4: the Awakening of the Lion. Sumter's effect on public feeling would there be a long war — or any? organizing an army the will of the people how women worked the camps a novel show Mr. Davis handles Congress his energy and industry society and the strangers joy over Virginia's secession. When tidings came of the fall of Fort Sumter, there was wild rejoicing throughout the South and it culminated at her Capital. All the great, and many of the little men of the GoveFort Sumter, there was wild rejoicing throughout the South and it culminated at her Capital. All the great, and many of the little men of the Government were serenaded by bands of the most patriotic musical persuasion. Bonfires blazed in every street and, by their red glare, crowds met and exchanged congratulations, amid the wildest enthusiasm; while the beverage dear to the cis-Atlantic heart was poured out in libations wonderful to see! One-half of the country thought that this victory of a few untrained gunners would prevent further progress of the war; that the Federal Government, seeing how determined was the stand the South ha
of interest, every tie of sympathy — as already one of the Confederate States. She was no longer neutral, they said. She had put her lance in rest and rallied to the charge, in the avowed quarrel that the troops attacked were on their way to oppress her next sister. And nothing could follow but Virginia's bright falchion must flash out, and the states must lock shields and press between her and the giant she had roused. The Gulf City had not been idle. The echo of the first gun at Charleston had roused her people; and with a wonderful accord they had sprung to arms. Law books were thrown aside, merchants locked up their ledgers, even students of theology forgot that they were men of peace-and all enrolled themselves in the crack companies. No wonder, when the very best blood of the state ran in the veins of the humblest private; when men of letters and culture and wealth refused any but the post of honor, with musket on shoulder; when the most delicate fingers of their fair
making bountiful preparation for the future. Everywhere in the South was earnest endeavor and heartfelt enthusiasm for the cause; but I saw it nowhere directed into such practical and productive channels, thus early, as in South Carolina. Charleston, Pensacola and Virginia had drained her of younger and more active men; but the older ones and her vast resources of slave labor made up for the loss, and neither time nor energy seemed to be misapplied. After a rest, I found a freight trail, drinking bad liquor by the canteen and swearing in a way that would have made the Army in Flanders sick with envy. In the latter amusement I joined internally; and it did me so much good that I bought the anti-administration newspaper of Charleston and, getting out of bullet range, put my back against a tree and tried to read. Mercury was ever a blithe and sportive god, and his gambols on Mount Olympus were noted in days of yore; but the modern namesake-or else my present position-had so
range of which no Federal force seemed yet ready to venture. On the Atlantic seaboard, too, the prospects, at this time, appeared more cheering. Girt as it was, with one unbroken line of watchful cruisers, with every port apparently sealed by blockade-southern ingenuity and pluck still defied them and ran in precious stores of arms, clothing and medicines. General Beauregard had taken active command of South Carolina and Georgia; and had put the defenses of both coasts-especially of Charleston and Savannah-into such a state of fitness as quite satisfied the Government and made the people of those states calm and confident in his ability to protect them and theirs. General Gustavus W. Smith--the friend and comrade of General Joe Johnston-had, like him, been rewarded for his sacrifices in coming South, and his able exertions afterward, by the coldness and neglect of the Government. But like him, too, he forgot personal wrongs; and, when ordered to North Carolina, threw his whole
tions for the fitting out of privateers. The first venture, the Sumter, was bought, equipped and put into commission at the end of April; than useless gunboats, been put into saucy and swift wasps like the Sumter, their stings must have driven northern commerce from the sea; and a bushwhacker, and Joseph E. Johnston but a guerrilla! When the Sumter began her work, she was soon followed by the Florida --a vessel somition; ag is the later substitution of the Alabama for the worn-out Sumter. During the long war, these three vessels-and but two of them ath railroad iron. There were also two small ones on the stocks at Charleston, and another at Savannah. The great difficulty of procuring propments of the Norfolk Navy Yard; the refuse of the harbor boats of Charleston, New Orleans, Savannah and Mobile to select from; and had, besidenvolved; for though James river, some of the western streams, and Charleston harbor were literally sown with torpedoes, yet only in rare and
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death., Chapter 31: the Chinese-Wall blockade, abroad and at home. (search)
n and speculation blockade companies sumptuary laws growth of evil power Charleston and Savannah running the fleet at Wilmington demoralization and disgust thr every hundred miles of coast! And so inefficient was the early blockade of Charleston, Wilmington and New Orleans, that traders ran in and out, actually with great because of no transportation! But who recalls the arrival of a blockader at Charleston, Savannah, or Wilmington, when its ventures were not exposed at the auctions estroyer with the finance, of the southern cause. The once fair cities of Charleston, Savannah and Wilmington suffered most from the blockade, both in destructionleet had been compelled to stand idly by and witness the bloodless reduction of Sumter. Later-when strengthened armaments threatened constant attack-Lee and Beauregaat river. The story were twicetold of a resistance-unequaled even by that at Charleston and beginning with first Union access to the river, by way of New Orleans. B
ed to itself; but it may be recalled that New Orleans was genuinely enjoying opera, as a necessary of life, long before New York deemed it essential to study bad translations of librettos, in warmlypacked congregations of thousands. Mobile, Charleston, Savannah and other cities also had considerable latent music among their amateurs; happily not then brought to the surface by the fierce friction of poverty. And what was the musical talent of the Capital, has elsewhere been hinted. When theand dash. Drewry's Bluff was a boldly-handled sketch of what the northern army persisted in calling Fort Darling. It showed the same venturesome originality in color-use, the same breadth and fidelity that marked Mr. Key's later pictures of Sumter, Charleston harbor and scenes on the James river. These pictures named in common, with minor sketches from pencils less known at that time-among them that of William L. Sheppard, now famous as graphic delineator of southern scenes-illustrate
ellknown poem of the time, found its way to many a camp-fire and became a classic about the Richmond hells. It began: You can never win them back, Never, never! And you'd better leave the track Now forever! Thoa you cut and deal the pack And copper every Jack, You'll lose stack after stack -- Forever! Everything tending to bathos-whether for the cause, or against it --caught its quick rebuke, at the hands of some glib funmaker. Once an enthusiastic admirer of the hero of Charleston indited a glowing ode, of which the refrain ran: Beau sabreur, beau canon, Beau soldat-Beauregard! Promptly came another, and most distorted version; its peculiar refrain enfolding: Beau Brummel, Beau Fielding, Beau Hickman-Beauregard! As it is not of record that the commander of the Army of Northern Virginia ever discovered the junior laureate, the writer will not essay to do so. Colonel Tom August, of the First Virginia, was the Charles Lamb of Confederate war-wits; geni
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