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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 388 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 347 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 217 51 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 164 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 153 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 146 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 132 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 128 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 128 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A.. You can also browse the collection for Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 61 results in 12 document sections:

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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 1: the invasion of Virginia. (search)
les east of the Junction, for the purpose of watching the fords of Bull Run immediately above its junction with the Occoquon, and those on the, and Ewell's brigade at and near Fairfax Station, all in front of Bull Run; while D. R. Jones' brigade was encamped on the south of the Run nard Manassas, and his plan was, for all the troops on the north of Bull Run to fall back to the south bank of that stream. Bonham, in the cen Stone Bridge on the Warrenton Pike; and Ewell, on the right, to Union Mills; and Evans was to retire from Loudoun and unite with Cocke; whil Ford, about a mile or two further down; and I was to move up to Union Mills in support of Ewell. His anticipation further was, that the enetchell's Ford; in which event the rest of the troops were to cross Bull Run and attack the enemy on both flanks-Longstreet crossing at Blackbuat the same time moving up towards Centreville, on the road from Union Mills, and attacking the enemy on his left and rear; while I was to fo
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 2: fight at Blackburn's Ford. (search)
ts assigned position in rear of the ford at Union Mills, and on my arrival there I found General Ew brigade and joined it at the position near Union Mills. I remained there inactive during the reston the railroad between Fairfax Station and Union Mills, and on this morning the bridge over Bull RBull Run, at the latter place, was likewise burned. After remaining for some time at Camp Walker, I waf Wolf Run Shoals, just below the junction of Bull Run and the Occoquon. Tyler exceeded his instruce seen by scouts sent to the opposite side of Bull Run, on the heights where he had taken his positiharacter of the musketry fire, we would cross Bull Run from our several positions and move to the aton the road leading from Yates' Ford, below Union Mills, to Manassas Junction. As soon as relievedpany on picket at Yates' Ford not far below Union Mills, retired from his post and reported in the peared in heavy force on the opposite bank of Bull Run and commenced building two bridges. He furth
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 3: early's brigade at Manassas. (search)
same as it had been on the 18th, to wit: Ewell at Union Mills; D. R. Jones at McLean's Ford; Longstreet, reinfore with artillery from the heights on the north of Bull Run near Blackburn's Ford, and I was ordered to occupyhole of Longstreet's brigade had been crossed over Bull Run, and were lying under cover at the foot of the hilrd's orders were that the whole force should cross Bull Run to the south side. I think this was about 11.0ther to the right I saw our line extending towards Bull Run, but I discovered no indications of a forward movered our right. We had now got to a point where Bull Run makes a considerable bend above Stone Bridge, and rsuit of a body of the enemy supposed to be across Bull Run above me. About this time it was reported to mere conversing we observed a body of troops across Bull Run, some distance below, moving in good order in the ft me, I moved my command farther into the bend of Bull Run, and put it in line across the bend with the flank
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 4: details of the battle of Manassas. (search)
eld the line of Bull Run, with our right at Union Mills and our left at Stone Bridge. EDwell's brion Pike from Centreville to Warrenton crosses Bull Run at Stone Bridge, and its general direction frng that flank and forcing us from the line of Bull Run. The three brigades of Tyler's division move, batteries established by the enemy north of Bull Run, near Blackburn's Ford, which was kept up steverging from the Warrenton Pike, moved across Bull Run at or near Sudley Mills, about three miles ab south of it, and nearly at right angles with Bull Run. Here they were reinforced first by Hampton'itating a rapid falling back from the line of Bull Run, which would most assuredly have resulted in mage to us than the evacuation of the line of Bull Run caused. So much for the question as betweore the battle, as he did not march on it and Bull Run was fordable anywhere. That burning could onhen he ordered the burning of the bridge over Bull Run, he had reason to apprehend that his comparat[3 more...]
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 5: operations along Bull Run. (search)
Chapter 5: operations along Bull Run. Immediately after the battle of the 21st a portion of our troops were moved across Bull Run and the former line north of that stream was re-occupied. The a front of Wolf Run Shoals, below the mouth of Bull Run. Our line was extended from this point by Lah Fairfax Court-House to me, extending from Union Mills on the right, through Centreville, to Stonen was on the right, with Ewell's brigade at Union Mills and mine on its left above that point. We Rodes' brigade was moved to the south of Bull Run to go into winter quarters, leaving my brigadaged in building new winter quarters south of Bull Run, and completing the earthworks covering McLean's Ford when the line of Bull Run was abandoned. About two weeks before the evacuation took plastock. The movement back from the line of Bull Run was in itself a very wise one in a strategic rt assumes that the evacuation of the line of Bull Run, was in consequence of his projected movement[2 more...]
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 6: manoeuvring on the Peninsula. (search)
Chapter 6: manoeuvring on the Peninsula. I landed and reported to General Magruder on the morning of the 9th of April. After the abandonment of the line of Bull Run by our troops, McClellan had moved the greater part of his army to the Peninsula, and by the 4th of April had landed about 100,000 men at or near Fortress Monroe. Magruder at that time occupied the lower Peninsula with a force which did not exceed in effective men 7,000 or 8,000. Upon this force McClellan advanced with his immense army, when Magruder fell back to the line of Warwick River, extending from Yorktown on York River across James River, and checked the enemy's advance. McClellan then sat down before the fortifications at Yorktown and along Warwick River and began a siege by regular approaches. When I arrived at Magruder's headquarters, I was informed by him that his force, before the arrival of mine, amounted to 12,000, he having been reinforced since the enemy's advance, by troops from the south
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 11: capture of Manassas Junction. (search)
d almost entirely to the 5th, 6th and 8th Louisiana, and the 60th Georgia Regiments, which were the only troops who drew trigger on our side, except the 13th Virginia when deployed as skirmishers to cover our withdrawal. The enemy reported his loss at 300. The two captured trains had been burned in the early part of the day, and the railroad bridge across Broad Run had been destroyed. A brigade of the enemy which advanced towards Manassas, after having been landed from a train coming from Alexandria, had been met by a party of our troops moving out from the Junction and routed, its commanding officer being killed. As soon as Ewell's division had rested and broiled a little meat, it moved from the Junction towards Blackburn's Ford on Bull Run, and the brigades became separated and bivouacked at different places, mine lying down in the open field. The other divisions had previously moved, and Stuart proceeded to burn the trains, and such stores as had not been carried off.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 12: the affair at Groveton. (search)
, under Brigadier General W. S. Taliaferro, had therefore been moved on the night of the 27th to the vicinity of the battlefield of the 21st of July, 1861, and A. P. Hill's to Centreville, with orders to Ewell to move up, by the northern bank of Bull Run, to the same locality with Taliaferro early on the morning of the 28th. At dawn on that morning, my brigade resumed the march, moving across Bull Run at Blackburn's Ford and then up the north bank to Stone Bridge, followed by Trimble's brigade.Bull Run at Blackburn's Ford and then up the north bank to Stone Bridge, followed by Trimble's brigade. We crossed at a ford just below Stone Bridge, and moved across the Warrenton Pike and through the fields between the Carter house and the Stone Tavern, where the battle of the 21st of July had begun, to the Sudley road, near where Jackson's division was already in position. Lawton's and Hays' brigades had by mistake taken the road to Centreville, but had now rejoined the rest of the division, and the whole of the brigades were placed under cover in the woods, north of the Warrenton Pike, t
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 13: second battle of Manassas. (search)
mile from the railroad. I halted at the edge of the woods to enable the other brigades to come up, as I was ahead of them, when General Jackson rode up and ordered me to move by my left flank to intercept a body of the enemy reported moving up Bull Run to our left. I did so, moving along with skirmishers ahead of the brigade until I came to the railroad, and then along that until I came to a field. It was now getting dark, and as my skirmishers moved into the field they were fired upon fr was moving on when I received an order to advance to the front from where I was, and in a few minutes afterwards another to move back by the right flank, as the report of the movement of the enemy around our left flank had proved untrue. I found that the other brigades of the division had bivouacked near where I had left them, and my own did the same. The enemy had been driven beyond Bull Run, and was in retreat to Centreville, our pursuit having been arrested by the approaching darkness.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 14: affair at Ox Hill or Chantilly. (search)
Chapter 14: affair at Ox Hill or Chantilly. Jackson's command, after having rested on the morning of the 31st, in the afternoon of that day was put in motion for the purpose of turning the enemy's position at Centreville. Crossing Bull Run at and near Sudley's Ford, it moved to the left over a country road, Jackson's division in front followed by Ewell's and Hill's bringing up the rear, until the Little River Turnpike was reached, when we turned towards Fairfax CourtHouse and bivouacked late at night. Early on the morning of September the 1st, the march was resumed, and continued until we reached the farm of Chantilly in the afternoon. The enemy was found in position, covering the retreat of his army, near Ox Hill, not far from Chantilly, and a short distance beyond which the Little River Pike, and the pike from Centreville to Fairfax Court-House, intersect. General Jackson at once put his troops in position on the ridge on the east of the Little River Pike, with his own d
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