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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 11 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 28, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States. You can also browse the collection for Butler King or search for Butler King in all documents.

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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, April, 1863. (search)
vilization. We halted in front of the house, and after cooking and eating, I walked up to the ranch, which is a comfortable, well-furnished wooden building. Mr. and Mrs. King had gone to Brownsville; but we were received by Mrs. Bee, the wife of the Brownsville general, who had heard I was on the road. She is a nice livMrs. King had gone to Brownsville; but we were received by Mrs. Bee, the wife of the Brownsville general, who had heard I was on the road. She is a nice lively little woman, a red-hot Southerner, glorying in the facts that she has no Northern relations or friends, and that she is a member of the Church of England. Mr. King first came to Texas as a steamboat captain, but now owns an immense tract of country, with 16,000 head of cattle, situated, however, in a wild and almost uninhaMr. King first came to Texas as a steamboat captain, but now owns an immense tract of country, with 16,000 head of cattle, situated, however, in a wild and almost uninhabited district. King's Ranch is distant from Brownsville only 125 miles, and we have been six days in reaching it. After drying our clothes and our food after the rain of last night, we started again at 2.30 P. M. We now entered a boundless and most fertile prairie, upon which, as far as the eye could reach, cattle were
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
cribed as a victory the word Fair-oaks, which was the engagement in which the regiment had lost its first color. Mr. Butler King, a member of Congress, whose acquaintance I had made in the Spottswood Hotel, took me to spend the evening at Mrs. S a very pleasant evening with Mrs. S -- , who had been much in England, and had made a large acquaintance there. Mr. Butler King is a Georgian gentleman, also very agreeable and well informed. It is surprising to hear the extraordinary equanimiland in the centre of the stream. I spent another very agreeable evening at Mrs. S-‘s, and met General Randolph, Mr. Butler King, and Mr. Conrad there; also Colonel Johnston, aid-de-camp to the President, who told me that they had been forced, iSecretary of War; but it is supposed that he and the President did not quite hit it off together. Mr. Conrad as well as Mr. King is a member of Congress, and he explained to me that, at the beginning of the war, each State was most desirous ofbeing