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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States. You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, April, 1863. (search)
re Renshaw, with a message that, unless the firing was stopped, he would massacREE the captured crew. After hearing this, Commodore Renshaw blew up his ship, with himself in her, after having given an order to the remainder, sauve qui peut. 13th April, 1863 (Monday). I breakfasted with General Bee, and took leave of all my Brownsville friends. McCarthy is to give me four times the value of my gold in Confederate notes. The value of Confederate paper has since decreased. At Charleston I was offered six to one for my gold, and at Richmond eight to one. We left Brownsville for San Antonio at 11 A. M. Our vehicle was a roomy, but rather overloaded, fourwheel carriage, with a canvas roof, and four mules. Besides McCarthy, there was a third passenger, in the shape of a young merchant of the Hebrew persuasion. Two horses were to join us, to help us through the deep sand. The country, on leaving Brownsville, is quite flat, the road, a natural one, sandy and very dust
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, May, 1863. (search)
y information, otherwise General Gist had made up his mind for some nasty work before the junction could be effected. He told me that the present expedition was rather inconvenient to him, as he had only been married three days before he left Charleston. He lent me a magnificent rug, and I slept very comfortably in the open air for the first time since I was in Texas. 20th may, 1863 (Wednesday). At 3 A. M. we were awoke by a great bombardment going on at Vicksburg, which lasted about th exhausted, at 9.30 A. M. General Loring came and reported himself soon after. He is a stout man with one arm. His division had arrived at Jackson from Crystal Springs about 6,000 strong; Evans's brigade, about 3,000, had also arrived from Charleston; and Maxey's brigade was in the act of marching into Jackson. I calculate, therefore, that General Johnston must now have nearly 25,000 men between Jackson and the Yazoo. I took an affectionate farewell of him and his officers, and he retu
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
. I left Augusta at 7 P. M. by train for Charleston. My car was much crowded with Yankee prisonreat proportion of them are foreigners. Fort Sumter now shows but little signs of the batteringon Sullivan's Island, one mile distant from Fort Sumter. There are excellent arrangements of--, an Sumter and Moultrie. On the other side of Fort Sumter is Fort Johnson, on James Island, Fort Cumm across Morris Island at the end nearest to Fort Sumter. General Ripley pointed at Fort Wagner withened to be the first to receive the fire of Fort Sumter, and after a quarter of an hour Monitor andhunderstorm. General Beauregard returned to Charleston this afternoon. 12th June, 1863 (Friday).t distance. At the time of the attack on Charleston last April, there were 30,000 men to defend and he also said that, even if the walls of Fort Sumter were battered down, the barbette battery woM., having taken forty-one hours coming from Charleston. The railroad between Petersburgh and Ri[37 more...]
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, July, 1863. (search)
n; that I had been all the way to Mexico, and entered the Southern States by the Rio Grande, for the express purpose of not breaking any legally established blockade. I told him I had visited all the Southern armies in Mississippi, Tennessee, Charleston, and Virginia, and seen the late campaign as General Longstreet's guest, but had in no way entered the Confederate service. I also gave him my word that I had not got in my possession any letters, either public or private, from any person in t son of them drowned there. I arrived at New York at 10 P. M., and drove to the Fifth Avenue Hotel. 13th July, 1863 (Monday). The luxury and comfort of New York and Philadelphia strike one as extraordinary after having lately come from Charleston and Richmond. The greenbacks seem to be nearly as good as gold. The streets are as full as possible of well-dressed people, and are crowded with able-bodied civilians capable of bearing arms, who have evidently no intention of doing so. They
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, Postscript. (search)
so in a very amicable spirit, and I think they rendered justice to my wish to explain to them without exaggeration the state of feeling amongst their enemies. Although these Northerners belonged to quite the upper classes, and were not likely to be led blindly by the absurd nonsense of the sensation press at New York, yet their ignorance of the state of the case in the South was very great. The recent successes had given them the impression that the last card of the South was played. Charleston was about to fall; Mobile, Savannah, and Wilmington would quickly follow; Lee's army they thought, was a disheartened, disorganized mob; Bragg's army in a still worse condition, fleeing before Rosecrans, who would carry every thing before him. They felt confident that the fall of the Mississippian fortresses would prevent communication from one bank to the other, and that the great river would soon be open to peaceful commerce. All these illusions have since been dispelled, but they p