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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Headquarters moved to Holly Springs-General McClernand in command-assuming command at Young's Point-operations above Vicksburg- fortifications about Vicksburg-the canal- Lake Providence-operations at Yazoo pass (search)
, but I had no opportunity of communicating with him after the destruction of the road and telegraph to my rear on the 20th. He did not know but what I was in the rear of the enemy and depending on him to open a new base of supplies for the troops with me. I had, before he started from Memphis, directed him to take with him a few small steamers suitable for the navigation of the Yazoo, not knowing but that I might want them to supply me after cutting loose from my base at Grenada. On the 23d I removed my headquarters back to Holly Springs. The troops were drawn back gradually, but without haste or confusion, finding supplies abundant and no enemy following. The road was not damaged south of Holly Springs by Van Dorn, at least not to an extent to cause any delay. As I had resolved to move headquarters to Memphis, and to repair the road to that point, I remained at Holly Springs until this work was completed. On the 10th of January, the work on the road from Holly Springs to
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Preparations for battle-thomas Carries the first line of the enemy-sherman Carries Missionary Ridge--battle of Lookout Mountain--General Hooker's fight (search)
the rest of the pontoon boats, completed, one hundred and sixteen in all, were carried up to and placed in North Chickamauga. The material for the roadway over these was deposited out of view of the enemy within a few hundred yards of the bank of the Tennessee, where the north end of the bridge was to rest. Hearing nothing from Burnside, and hearing much of the distress in Washington on his account, I could no longer defer operations for his relief. I determined, therefore, to do on the 23d, with the Army of the Cumberland, what had been intended to be done on the 24th. The position occupied by the Army of the Cumberland had been made very strong for defence during the months it had been besieged. The line was about a mile from the town, and extended from Citico Creek, a small stream running near the base of Missionary Ridge and emptying into the Tennessee about two miles below the mouth of the South Chickamauga, on the left, to Chattanooga Creek on the right. All commandi
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The relief of Knoxville-headquarters moved to Nashville-visiting Knoxville-cipher dispatches --Withholding orders (search)
attanooga until the following night, the 29th. I then found that Thomas had not yet started Granger, thus having lost a full day which I deemed of so much importance in determining the fate of Knoxville. Thomas and Granger were aware that on the 23d of the month Burnside had telegraphed that his supplies would last for ten or twelve days and during that time he could hold out against Longstreet, but if not relieved within the time indicated he would be obliged to surrender or attempt to retrg at Chattanooga. But I had become satisfied that Burnside would not be rescued if his relief depended upon General Granger's movements. Sherman had left his camp on the north side of the Tennessee River, near Chattanooga, on the night of the 23d, the men having two days cooked rations in their haversacks. Expecting to be back in their tents by that time and to be engaged in battle while out, they took with them neither overcoats nor blankets. The weather was already cold, and at night t
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Movement by the left flank-battle of North Anna-an incident of the March-moving on Richmond-South of the Pamunkey-position of the National Army (search)
n in the centre, and Cutler on the right. Lee was found intrenched along the front of their line. The whole of Hill's corps was sent against Warren's right before it had got in position. A brigade of Cutler's division was driven back, the enemy following, but assistance coming up the enemy was in turn driven back into his trenches with heavy loss in killed and wounded, with about five hundred prisoners left in our hands. By night Wright's corps was up ready to reinforce Warren. On the 23d Hancock's corps was moved to the wooden bridge which spans the North Anna River just west of where the Fredericksburg Railroad crosses. It was near night when the troops arrived. They found the bridge guarded, with troops intrenched, on the north side. Hancock sent two brigades, Egan's and Pierce's, to the right and left, and when properly disposed they charged simultaneously. The bridge was carried quickly, the enemy retreating over it so hastily that many were shoved into the river, and
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The campaign in Georgia-Sherman's March to the sea-war anecdotes-the March on Savannah- investment of Savannah-capture of Savannah (search)
e soldier replied, Madam, our orders are to kill every bloodhound. But this is not a bloodhound, said the lady. Well, madam, we cannot tell what it will grow into if we leave it behind, said the soldier as he went off with it. Notwithstanding these anecdotes, and the necessary hardship they would seem to imply, I do not believe there was much unwarrantable pillaging considering that we were in the enemy's territory and without any supplies except such as the country afforded. On the 23d Sherman, with the left wing, reached Milledgeville. The right wing was not far off: but proceeded on its way towards Savannah destroying the road as it went. The troops at Milledgeville remained over a day to destroy factories, buildings used for military purposes, etc., before resuming its march. The governor, who had been almost defying Mr. Davis before this, now fled precipitately, as did the legislature of the State and all the State officers. The governor, Sherman says, was carefu
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sherman's March North-Sheridan ordered to Lynchburg-Canby ordered to move against Mobile-movements of Schofield and Thomas-capture of Columbia, South Carolina-Sherman in the Carolinas (search)
war, and desertions from the Confederate army were much more numerous than the voluntary accessions. There was some fighting at Averysboro [Averasboro] on the 16th between Johnston's troops and Sherman's, with some loss; and at Bentonville on the 19th and 21st of March, but Johnston withdrew from the contest before the morning of the 22d. Sherman's loss in these last engagements in killed, wounded, and missing, was about sixteen hundred. Sherman's troops at last reached Goldsboro on the 23d of the month and went into bivouac; and there his men were destined to have a long rest. Schofield was there to meet him with the troops which had been sent to Wilmington. Sherman was no longer in danger. He had Johnston confronting him; but with an army much inferior to his own, both in numbers and morale. He had Lee to the north of him with a force largely superior; but I was holding Lee with a still greater force, and had he made his escape and gotten down to reinforce Johnston, She