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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 115 115 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 41 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 41 41 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 30 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 21 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 19 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 14 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 14 14 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 12 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for April 9th, 1865 AD or search for April 9th, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 2 document sections:

Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Negotiations at Appomattox-interview with Lee at McLean's House-the terms of surrender-lee's surrender-interview with Lee after the surrender (search)
his army, and I answered him as follows: Headquarters Armies of the U. S., April 9, 1865 General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. A. Your note of yesterday is receivet an escort with the officer bearing this message through his lines to me. April 9, 1865 General:--I received your note of this morning on the picket-line whithehe note I was cured. I wrote the following note in reply and hastened on: April 9, 1865 General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. Armies. Your note of this date is buls, and commenced writing out the following terms: Appomattox C. H., Va., April 9th, 1865 Gen. R. E. Lee, Comd'g C. S. A. Gen.: In accordance with the substance nd wrote out the following letter: Headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, April 9, 1865 General:--I received your letter of this date containing the terms of ttelegraphed to Washington as follows: Headquarters Appomattox C. H., Va., April 9th, 1865, 4.30 P. M. Hon. E. M. Stanton: Secretary of War, Washington. General
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The end of the war-the March to Washington- one of Lincoln's anecdotes-grand review at Washington-characteristics of Lincoln and Stanton-estimate of the different corps commanders (search)
major-general of volunteers. He is a man who makes friends of those under him by his consideration of their wants and their dues. As a commander, he won their confidence by his coolness in action and by his clearness of perception in taking in the situation under which he was placed at any given time. Griffin, Humphreys, and Mackenzie were good corps commanders, but came into that position so near to the close of the war as not to attract public attention. All three served as such, in the last campaign of the armies of the Potomac and the James, which culminated at Appomattox Court House, on the 9th of April, 1865. The sudden collapse of the rebellion monopolized attention to the exclusion of almost everything else. I regarded Mackenzie as the most promising young officer in the army. Graduating at West Point, as he did, during the second year of the war, he had won his way up to the command of a corps before its close. This he did upon his own merit and without influence.