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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 999 7 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 382 26 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 379 15 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 288 22 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 283 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 243 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 233 43 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 210 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 200 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 186 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for Longstreet or search for Longstreet in all documents.

Your search returned 58 results in 11 document sections:

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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Assuming the command at Chattanooga-opening a line of supplies-battle of Wauhatchie-on the picket line (search)
twice the distance we had from Chattanooga, in order to reach Lookout Valley; but on the night of the 28th and 29th an attack was made on Geary at Wauhatchie by Longstreet's corps. When the battle commenced, Hooker ordered Howard up from Brown's Ferry. He had three miles to march to reach Geary. On his way he was fired upon by ies. At one place there was a tree which had fallen across the stream, and which was used by the soldiers of both armies in drawing water for their camps. General Longstreet's corps was stationed there at the time, and wore blue of a little different shade from our uniform. Seeing a soldier in blue on this log, I rode up to himn blue on this log, I rode up to him, commenced conversing with him, and asked whose corps he belonged to. He was very polite, and, touching his hat to me, said he belonged to General Longstreet's corps. I asked him a few questionsbut not with a view of gaining any particular information-all of which he answered, and I rode off.
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Condition of the Army-rebuilding the Railroad- General Burnside's situation-orders for battle-plans for the attack-hooker's position- Sherman's movements (search)
bout Chattanooga. On the 4th of November Longstreet left our front with about fifteen thousand t be done for his relief. On the 7th, before Longstreet could possibly have reached Knoxville, I ordhattanooga when the battle should begin. Longstreet had a railroad as far as Loudon; but from there by Tuesday at farthest. If you can hold Longstreet in check until he gets up, or by skirmishingemy back from here and place a force between Longstreet and Bragg that must inevitably make the forming there, you can tell better how to resist Longstreet's attack than I can direct. With your showiter they got even one day east from here? Longstreet, for some reason or other, stopped at Loudonback speedily to Chattanooga. The day after Longstreet left Loudon, Sherman reached Bridgeport in pe railroad between Cleveland and Dalton, and Longstreet thus cut off from communication with the Sou relieve East Tennessee, if he can hold out. Longstreet passing through our lines to Kentucky need n
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Preparations for battle-thomas Carries the first line of the enemy-sherman Carries Missionary Ridge--battle of Lookout Mountain--General Hooker's fight (search)
a force from the east — a letter was received from Bragg which contained these words: As there may still be some non-combatants in Chattanooga, I deem it proper to notify you that prudence would dictate their early withdrawal. Of course, I understood that this was a device intended to deceive; but I did not know what the intended deception was. On the 22d, however, a deserter came in who informed me that Bragg was leaving our front, and on that day Buckner's division was sent to reinforce Longstreet at Knoxville, and another division [Patrick Cleburne's] started to follow but was recalled. The object of Bragg's letter, no doubt, was in some way to detain me until Knoxville could be captured, and his troops there be returned to Chattanooga. During the night of the 21st the rest of the pontoon boats, completed, one hundred and sixteen in all, were carried up to and placed in North Chickamauga. The material for the roadway over these was deposited out of view of the enemy within a
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Battle of Chattanooga-a gallant charge-complete Rout of the enemy-pursuit of the Confederates--General Bragg--remarks on Chattanooga (search)
ing Chattanooga. It was reported and believed that he had come out to reconcile a serious difference between Bragg and Longstreet, and finding this difficult to do, planned the campaign against Knoxville, to be conducted by the latter general. I had known both Bragg and Longstreet before the war, the latter very well. We had been three years at West Point together, and, after my graduation, for a time in the same regiment. Then we served together in the Mexican War. I had known Bragg in Mexi: My God, Mr. Bragg, you have quarrelled with every officer in the army, and now you are quarrelling with yourself! Longstreet was an entirely different man. He was brave, honest, intelligent, a very capable soldier, subordinate to his superiors,as never on the lookout to detect a slight, but saw one as soon as anybody when intentionally given. It may be that Longstreet was not sent to Knoxville for the reason stated, but because Mr. Davis had an exalted opinion of his own military geniu
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The relief of Knoxville-headquarters moved to Nashville-visiting Knoxville-cipher dispatches --Withholding orders (search)
try, it was supposed he could hold out until Longstreet was driven away, after which event East Tenn thence towards Knoxville, and, uniting with Longstreet, make a sudden dash upon Burnside. When d during that time he could hold out against Longstreet, but if not relieved within the time indicatve a copy of this fall into the hands of General Longstreet. They made the trip safely; General Longg had about half this number [not including Longstreet], but his position was supposed to be impregee River to the relief of Knoxville and that Longstreet was therefore in danger. But the first greadriven from the field. Burnside followed Longstreet only to Strawberry Plains, some twenty miles more east, and then stopped, believing that Longstreet would leave the State. The latter did not dBurnside that he should go with him to drive Longstreet out of Tennessee; but Burnside assured him tft, he would be amply prepared to dispose of Longstreet without availing himself of this offer. As [5 more...]
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Operations in Mississippi-Longstreet in east Tennessee-commissioned Lieutenant-General-Commanding the armies of the United States-first interview with President Lincoln (search)
Operations in Mississippi-Longstreet in east Tennessee-commissioned Lieutenant-General-Commanding the armies of the United States-first inte presumably to operate against Sherman, and two more divisions to Longstreet in East Tennessee. Seeing that Johnston had depleted in this waye reinforcements Longstreet had received. My object was to drive Longstreet out of East Tennessee as a part of the preparations for my springial.) advised me that he thought it would be a good thing to keep Longstreet just where he was; that he was perfectly quiet in East Tennessee, and, adopting that view, countermanded the orders for pursuit of Longstreet. On the 12th of February I ordered Thomas to take Dalton and n for the same reason. He could not carry supplies with him, and Longstreet was between him and the supplies still left in the country. LongLongstreet, in his retreat, would be moving towards his supplies, while our forces, following, would be receding from theirs. On the 2d of March,
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Grand movement of the Army of the Potomac- crossing the Rapidan-entering the Wilderness- battle of the Wilderness (search)
Potomac, Lee ordered [A. P.] Hill, Ewell and Longstreet, each commanding corps, to move to the rightre given for the following morning. We knew Longstreet with 12,000 men was on his way to join Hill'there should be no battle on his right until Longstreet got up. This is evident from the fact that ing the attacking party and to strike before Longstreet got up, Lee was ahead in his assault on our by the hour named, but learning in time that Longstreet was moving a part of his corps by the Cathar artillery, to cover the approaches by which Longstreet was expected. This disposition was made in this position until, along in the afternoon, Longstreet came upon him. The retreating column of Hille Confederate General Jenkins was killed and Longstreet seriously wounded [by his own men] in this engagement. Longstreet had to leave the field, not to resume command for many weeks. His loss was a front of all remnants that might be left of Longstreet's or Hill's commands. This brigade having b[3 more...]
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, After the battle-telegraph and signal service- movement by the left flank (search)
to Richmond in time to attempt to crush Butler before I could get there; second, I wanted to get between his army and Richmond if possible; and, if not, to draw him into the open field. But Lee, by accident, beat us to Spottsylvania. Our wagon trains had been ordered easterly of the roads the troops were to march upon before the movement commenced. Lee interpreted this as a semi-retreat of the Army of the Potomac to Fredericksburg, and so informed his government. Accordingly he ordered Longstreet's corps-now commanded by Anderson — to move in the morning (the 8th) to Spottsylvania. But the woods being still on fire, Anderson could not go into bivouac, and marched directly on to his destination that night. By this accident Lee got possession of Spottsylvania. It is impossible to say now what would have been the result if Lee's orders had been obeyed as given; but it is certain that we would have been in Spottsylvania, and between him and his capital. My belief is that there woul
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sheridan's advance-visit to Sheridan-Sheridan's victory in the Shenandoah-Sheridan's ride to Winchester-close of the campaign for the winter (search)
ington City, started on the 15th leaving Wright in command. His army was then at Cedar Creek, some twenty miles south of Winchester. The next morning while at Front Royal, Sheridan received a dispatch from Wright, saying that a dispatch from Longstreet to Early had been intercepted. It directed the latter to be ready to move and to crush Sheridan as soon as he, Longstreet, arrived. On the receipt of this news Sheridan ordered the cavalry up the valley to join Wright. On the 18th of OctoLongstreet, arrived. On the receipt of this news Sheridan ordered the cavalry up the valley to join Wright. On the 18th of October Early was ready to move, and during the night succeeded in getting his troops in the rear of our left flank, which fled precipitately and in great confusion down the valley, losing eighteen pieces of artillery and a thousand or more prisoners [Battle of Cedar Creek]. The right under General Getty maintained a firm and steady front, falling back to Middletown where it took a position and made a stand. The cavalry went to the rear, seized the roads leading to Winchester and held them for the
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Interview with Sheridan-Grand movement of the Army of the Potomac-Sheridan's advance on five Forks-battle of five Forks-Parke and Wright storm the enemy's line-battles before Petersburg (search)
as they did I sent the additional news to these points. Finding at length that they were all in, I mounted my horse to join the troops who were inside the works. When I arrived there I rode my horse over the parapet just as Wright's three thousand prisoners were coming out. I was soon joined inside by General Meade and his staff. Lee made frantic efforts to recover at least part of the lost ground. Parke on our right was repeatedly assaulted, but repulsed every effort. Before noon Longstreet was ordered up from the north side of the James River, thus bringing the bulk of Lee's army around to the support of his extreme right. As soon as I learned this I notified Weitzel and directed him to keep up close to the enemy and to have [George L.] Hartsuff, commanding the Bermuda Hundred front, to do the same thing, and if they found any break to go in; Hartsuff especially should do so, for this would separate Richmond and Petersburg. Sheridan, after he had returned to Five Forks,
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