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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 730 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 693 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 408 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 377 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 355 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 345 5 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 308 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 280 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 254 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 219 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for John Pope or search for John Pope in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 4 document sections:

Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Outbreak of the rebellion-presiding at a Union meeting-mustering officer of State troops- Lyon at camp Jackson-services tendered to the government (search)
nfantry, the regiment of which I subsequently became colonel. I mustered one regiment afterwards, when my services for the State were about closed. Brigadier-General John Pope was stationed at Springfield, as United States mustering officer, all the time I was in the State service. He was a native of Illinois and well acquainen the first company of Galena volunteers was raised. Foulk I had known in St. Louis when I was a citizen of that city. I had been three years at West Point with Pope and had served with him a short time during the Mexican war, under General Taylor. I saw a good deal of him during my service with the State. On one occasion he ll he could for me. I declined to receive endorsement for permission to fight for my country. Going home for a day or two soon after this conversation with General Pope, I wrote from Galena the following letter to the Adjutant-General of the Army. Galena, Illinois, May 24, 1861 Col. L. Thomas, Adjt. Gen. U. S. A., Washing
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Appointed Colonel of the 21st Illinois-Personnel of the regiment-general Logan-March to Missouri-movement against Harris at Florida, Mo. --General Pope in command-stationed at Mexico, Mo. (search)
Appointed Colonel of the 21st Illinois-Personnel of the regiment-general Logan-March to Missouri-movement against Harris at Florida, Mo. --General Pope in command-stationed at Mexico, Mo. While I was absent from the State capital on this occasion the President's second call for troops was issued. This time it was for 300,000 men, for three years or the war. This brought into the United States service all the regiments then in the State service. These had elected their officers from highess now. They had evidently been led to believe that the National troops carried death and devastation with them wherever they went. In a short time after our return to Salt River bridge I was ordered with my regiment to the town of Mexico. General Pope was then commanding the district embracing all of the State of Missouri between the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, with his headquarters in the village of Mexico. I was assigned to the command of a sub-district embracing the troops in the i
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Halleck Assumes Command in the Field-The Advance upon Corinth-Occupation of Corinth- The Army Separated (search)
ately assumed command in the field. On the 21st General Pope arrived with an army 30,000 strong, fresh from tOhio, Buell commanding; the Army of the Mississippi, Pope commanding; and the Army of the Tennessee [Grant]. Huell commanded the centre, the Army of the Ohio; and Pope the left wing, the Army of the Mississippi. I was n after the battle of Shiloh. In fact the arrival of Pope should not have been awaited. There was no time froenerally, if not all the time, with the right wing. Pope being on the extreme left did not see so much of hist so as to form a new line well up to the enemy, but Pope was ordered back to conform with the general line. ht now rested west on the Mobile and Ohio railroad. Pope's left commanded the Memphis and Charleston railroad the centre and right, ready to advance at daylight, Pope would find no natural obstacle in his front and, I bhe occupation of Corinth by the National troops, General Pope was sent in pursuit of the retreating garrison a
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance of Van Dorn and Price-Price enters Iuka --battle of Iuka (search)
march up to Bolivar to take their place. On the 7th of September I learned of the advance of Van Dorn and Price, apparently upon Corinth. One division was brought from Memphis to Bolivar to meet any emergency that might arise from this move of the enemy. I was much concerned because my first duty, after holding the territory acquired within my command, was to prevent further reinforcing of Bragg in Middle Tennessee. Already the Army of Northern Virginia had defeated the army under General Pope and was invading Maryland. In the Centre General Buell was on his way to Louisville and Bragg marching parallel to him with a large Confederate force for the Ohio River. I had been constantly called upon to reinforce Buell until at this time my entire force numbered less than 50,000 men, of all arms. This included everything from Cairo south within my jurisdiction. If I too should be driven back, the Ohio River would become the line dividing the belligerents west of the Alleghenies