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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 374 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 130 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 113 13 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 74 8 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 65 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 61 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 7 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 52 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 42 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for Richard Taylor or search for Richard Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 7 document sections:

Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Promotion to first Lieutenant-capture of the City of Mexico-the Army-Mexican soldiers- peace negotiations (search)
rpetuation of his own fame. On the other hand, General Taylor's, I think, indicate that he considered the admand been in battle under both General Scott and General Taylor. The former divided his force of 10,500 men in open except in crossing the Rio Frio mountain. General Taylor pursued the same course in marching toward an et the same time than was the custom under Scott and Taylor. The victories in Mexico were, in every instance two reasons for this. Both General Scott and General Taylor had such armies as are not often got together. he battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, General Taylor had a small army, but it was composed exclusive never faced an enemy than the one commanded by General Taylor in the earliest two engagements of the Mexican made them both candidates for the Presidency. General Taylor was nominated in 1848, and was elected. Four yican war made three presidential candidates, Scott, Taylor, and Pierce --and any number of aspirants for that
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Outbreak of the rebellion-presiding at a Union meeting-mustering officer of State troops- Lyon at camp Jackson-services tendered to the government (search)
serving, and, by chance, with Senator S. A. Douglas. The only members of Congress I knew were Washburne and Philip Foulk. With the former, though he represented my district and we were citizens of the same town, I only became acquainted at the meeting when the first company of Galena volunteers was raised. Foulk I had known in St. Louis when I was a citizen of that city. I had been three years at West Point with Pope and had served with him a short time during the Mexican war, under General Taylor. I saw a good deal of him during my service with the State. On one occasion he said to me that I ought to go into the United States service. I told him I intended to do so if there was a war. He spoke of his acquaintance with the public men of the State, and said he could get them to recommend me for a position and that he would do all he could for me. I declined to receive endorsement for permission to fight for my country. Going home for a day or two soon after this conversation
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Siege of Vicksburg (search)
Bluff and about midway between the Big Black and the Yazoo. A brigade of Blair's division and twelve hundred cavalry had already, on Blair's return from the Yazoo, been sent to the same place with instructions to watch the crossings of the Big Black river, to destroy the roads in his (Blair's) front, and to gather or destroy all supplies. On the 7th of June our little force of colored and white troops across the Mississippi, at Milliken's Bend, were attacked by about 3,000 men from Richard Taylor's trans-Mississippi command. With the aid of the gunboats they were speedily repelled. I sent [Gen. Joseph A.] Mower's brigade over with instructions to drive the enemy beyond the Tensas Bayou; and we had no further trouble in that quarter during the siege. This was the first important engagement of the war in which colored troops were under fire. These men were very raw, having all been enlisted since the beginning of the siege, but they behaved well. On the 8th of June a full d
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Johnston's movements-fortifications at Haines' Bluff-explosion of the mine-explosion of the second mine-preparing for the assault-the Flag of truce-meeting with Pemberton-negotiations for surrender-accepting the terms- surrender of Vicksburg (search)
e at once taken to render such an attempt abortive. Our pickets were doubled; Admiral Porter was notified, so that the river might be more closely watched; material was collected on the west bank of the river to be set on fire and light up the river if the attempt was made; and batteries were established along the levee crossing the peninsula on the Louisiana side. Had the attempt been made the garrison of Vicksburg would have been drowned, or made prisoners on the Louisiana side. General Richard Taylor was expected on the west bank to co-operate in this movement, I believe, but he did not come, nor could he have done so with a force sufficient to be of service. The Mississippi was now in our possession from its source to its mouth, except in the immediate front of Vicksburg and of Port Hudson. We had nearly exhausted the country, along a line drawn from Lake Providence to opposite Bruinsburg. The roads west were not of a character to draw supplies over for any considerable force
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Grand movement of the Army of the Potomac- crossing the Rapidan-entering the Wilderness- battle of the Wilderness (search)
.-Gen. W. N. Pendleton, Commanding. Brig.-Gen. E. P. Alexander's division. but one General officer reported present for duty in the artillery, and Alexander's name not on the original. Cabell's Battalion. manly's Battery. 1st co. Richmond Howitzers. Carleton's Battery. Calloway's Battery. Haskell's Battalion. Branch's Battery. Nelson's Battery. garden's Battery. Rowan Battery. Huger's Battalion. Smith's Battery. Moody Battery. Woolfolk Battery. Parker's Battery. Taylor's Battery. Fickling's Battery. Martin's Battery. Gibb's Battalion. Davidson's Battery. Dickenson's Battery. Otey's Battery. Brig.-Gen. A. L. Long's division. Braxton's Battalion. Lee Battery. 1st Md. Artillery. Stafford artillery. Alleghany artillery. Cutshaw's Battalion. Charlotteville artillery. Staunton artillery. Courtney artillery. Carter's Battalion. Morris artillery. Orange artillery. King William artillery. Jeff Davis artillery. Nelson's Bat
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The capture of Petersburg-meeting President Lincoln in Petersburg-the capture of Richmond --pursuing the enemy-visit to Sheridan and Meade (search)
ft, Sheridan feeling certain that there lay the route by which the enemy intended to escape. He wanted to attack, feeling that if time was given, the enemy would get away; but Meade prevented this, preferring to wait till his troops were all up. At this juncture Sheridan sent me a letter which had been handed to him by a colored man, with a note from himself saying that he wished I was there myself. The letter was dated Amelia Court House, April 5th, and signed by Colonel [William B.] Taylor. It was to his mother, and showed the demoralization of the Confederate army. Sheridan's note also gave me the information as here related of the movements of that day. I received a second message from Sheridan on the 5th, in which he urged more emphatically the importance of my presence. This was brought to me by a scout in gray uniform. It was written on tissue paper, and wrapped up in tin-foil such as chewing tobacco is folded in. This was a precaution taken so that if the scout shoul
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sherman and Johnston-Johnston's surrender to Sherman-capture of Mobile-Wilson's expedition — capture of Jefferson Davis--General Thomas's qualities-estimate of General Canby (search)
reason of their railroad connections, as depots of supplies, and because of their manufactories of war material. They were fortified or intrenched, and there was considerable fighting before they were captured. Macon [Georgia, April 20] surrendered on the 21st of April. Here news was received of the negotiations for the surrender of Johnston's army. Wilson belonged to the military division commanded by Sherman, and of course was bound by his terms. This stopped all fighting. General Richard Taylor had now become the senior Confederate officer still at liberty east of the Mississippi River, and on the 4th of May he surrendered everything within the limits of this extensive command [at Citronelle, Alabama]. General E. Kirby Smith surrendered the trans-Mississippi department on the 26th of May, leaving no other Confederate army at liberty to continue the war. Wilson's raid resulted in the capture of the fugitive president of the defunct confederacy before he got out of the co