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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,404 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 200 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 188 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 184 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 166 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 164 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 132 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 100 0 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 100 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) or search for Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) in all documents.

Your search returned 66 results in 15 document sections:

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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Army life-causes of the Mexican war-camp Salubrity (search)
ettled by Americans who had received authority from Mexico to colonize. These colonists paid very little attee almost from the start, though the constitution of Mexico did not, nor does it now, sanction that institutionnt of their own, and war existed, between Texas and Mexico, in name from that time until 1836, when active hos, however, the same people — who with permission of Mexico had colonized Texas, and afterwards set up slavery manner in which the subsequent war was forced upon Mexico cannot. The fact is, annexationists wanted more teitory between the Nueces River and the Rio Grande. Mexico had never recognized the independence of Texas, andtion, but went beyond, apparently in order to force Mexico to initiate war. It is to the credit of the American nation, however, that after conquering Mexico, and while practically holding the country in our possession, en; more than it was worth, or was likely to be, to Mexico. To us it was an empire and of incalculable value;
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Corpus Christi-Mexican smuggling-spanish rule in Mexico-supplying transportation (search)
rity accomplished the object of their youthful ambition. Under Spanish rule Mexico was prohibited from producing anything that the mother-country could supply. Tvenue only ; and tobacco, which cannot be raised in Spain, but is indigenous to Mexico, offered a fine instrumentality for securing this prime object of government. hould adopt as their own the laws then in existence. The only change was, that Mexico became her own executor of the laws and the recipient of the revenues. The tobrovoke hostilities. We were sent to provoke a fight, but it was essential that Mexico should commence it. It was very doubtful whether Congress would declare war; but if Mexico should attack our troops, the Executive could announce, Whereas, war exists by the acts of, etc., and prosecute the contest with vigor. Once initiated thrable posthumous history the stay-at-home traitor can hope for is-oblivion. Mexico showing no willingness to come to the Nueces to drive the invaders from her soi
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Trip to Austin-promotion to full second Lieutenant-Army of occupation (search)
risti it was quite large, including the cavalry escort, Paymaster, Major Dix, his clerk and the officers who, like myself, were simply on leave; but all the officers on leave, except Lieutenant [Calvin] Benjamin-afterwards killed in the valley of Mexico-Lieutenant, now General, [Christopher Colon] Augur, and myself, concluded to spend their allotted time at San Antonio and return from there. We were all to be back at Corpus Christi by the end of the month. The paymaster was detained in Austin g them was less cruel and much more amusing. It is a well-known fact that where domestic animals are used for specific purposes from generation to generation, the descendants are easily, as a rule, subdued to the same uses. At that time in Northern Mexico the mule, or his ancestors, the horse and the ass, was seldom used except for the saddle or pack. At all events the Corpus Christi mule resisted the new use to which he was being put. The treatment he was subjected to in order to overcome h
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The Mexican war-the battle of Palo Alto-the battle of Resaca de la Palma-Army of invasion- General Taylor-movement on Camargo (search)
airs; but we had only a faint conception of their magnitude until they were fought over in the North by the Press and the reports came back to us. At the same time, or about the same time, we learned that war existed between the United States and Mexico, by the acts of the latter country. On learning this fact General Taylor transferred our camps to the south or west bank of the river, and Matamoras was occupied [May 18]. We then became the Army of invasion. Up to this time Taylor had none b Reinforcements having arrived, in the month of August the movement commenced from Matamoras to Camargo, the head of navigation on the Rio Grande. The line of the Rio Grande was all that was necessary to hold, unless it was intended to invade Mexico from the North. In that case the most natural route to take was the one which General Taylor selected. It entered a pass in the Sierra Madre Mountains, at Monterey [now Monterrey], through which the main road runs to the City of Mexico. Monter
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Political Intrigue — Buena Vista — movement against Vera Cruz-siege and capture of Vera Cruz (search)
ore to give him command of the army of conquest. The plans submitted by Scott for a campaign in Mexico were disapproved by the administration, and he replied, in a tone possibly a little disrespectfhe 27th of May, 1846 [May 21]. Four days later General Scott was notified that he need not go to Mexico. General [Edmund P.] Gaines was next in rank, but he was too old and feeble to take the field. es: the design would have been too transparent. It was finally decided to send General Scott to Mexico in chief command, and to authorize him to carry out his own original plan: that is, capture Vera Grande, Matamoras and Saltillo from the first. Now that he was in command of all the forces in Mexico, he withdrew from Taylor most of his regular troops and left him only enough volunteers, as he tnished that had been pledged, other war material was withheld and Scott had scarcely started for Mexico before the President undertook to supersede him by the appointment of Senator Thomas H. Benton [
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, March to Jalapa-battle of Cerro Gordo-Perote-Puebla-Scott and Taylor (search)
ad been great delay in obtaining the authority of Congress for the raising of the troops asked for by the administration. A bill was before the National Legislature from early in the session of 1846-7, authorizing the creation of ten additional regiments for the war to be attached to the regular army, but it was the middle of February before it became a law. Appointments of commissioned officers had then to be made; men had to be enlisted, the regiments equipped and the whole transported to Mexico. It was August before General Scott received reinforcement sufficient to warrant an advance. His moving column, not even now more than ten thousand strong, was in four divisions, commanded by Generals Twiggs, Worth, Pillow and Quitman. There was also a cavalry corps under General [William S.] Harney, composed of detachments of the 1st, 2d, and 3d dragoons. The advance commenced on the 7th of August with Twiggs's division in front. The remaining three divisions followed, with an interval
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance on the City of Mexico-battle of Contreras-assault at Churubusco-negotiations for peace-battle of Molino del Rey-storming of Chapultepec-San Cosme-evacuation of the City-Halls of the Montezumas (search)
he summit in three days after leaving Puebla. The City of Mexico lies west of Rio Frio mountain, on a plain backed by anothttack. All the troops with General Scott in the valley of Mexico, except a part of the division of General Quitman at San Aed to be about the severest battle fought in the valley of Mexico. General Scott coming upon the battle-field about this jua halt. General Franklin Pierce had joined the army in Mexico, at Puebla, a short time before the advance upon the capitt of the United States to negotiate a treaty of peace with Mexico, was with the army, and either he or General Scott thoughtn Mr. Trist and the commissioners appointed on the part of Mexico, until the 2d of September. At that time Mr. Trist handedin his ultimatum. Texas was to be given up absolutely by Mexico, and New Mexico and California ceded to the United States op and on the rocky and precipitous sides. The City of Mexico is supplied with water by two aqueducts resting on strong
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Promotion to first Lieutenant-capture of the City of Mexico-the Army-Mexican soldiers- peace negotiations (search)
o Alto in May, 1846, a second lieutenant, and I entered the city of Mexico sixteen months later with the same rank, after having been in all tg the mountains east of Perote, extends to the cities of Puebla and Mexico. The route travelled by the army before reaching Puebla, goes overme than was the custom under Scott and Taylor. The victories in Mexico were, in every instance, over vastly superior numbers. There were ade by some of these men as I have ever seen made by soldiers. Now Mexico has a standing army larger than that of the United States. They hafter the fall of the capital and the dispersal of the government of Mexico, it looked very much as if military occupation of the country for ay was to be pursued. There were not troops enough in the valley of Mexico to occupy many points, but now that there was no organized army of ia, for the sum of $15,000,000. Soon after entering the city of Mexico, the opposition of Generals Pillow, Worth and Colonel [James] Dunca
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Treaty of peace-mexican Bull fights-regimental quartermaster-trip to Popocatepetl-trip to the caves of Mexico (search)
of peace-mexican Bull fights-regimental quartermaster-trip to Popocatepetl-trip to the caves of Mexico The treaty of peace between the two countries was signed by the commissioners of each side eaa-and they are not an institution in any part of the country. During one of my recent visits to Mexico, bull fights were got up in my honor at Puebla and at Pachuca. I was not notified in advance soformance; but in both cases I civilly declined to attend. Another amusement of the people of Mexico of that day, and one which nearly all indulged in, male and female, old and young, priest and laleasure there was to be had out of mountain climbing, and that we would visit the great caves of Mexico, some ninety miles from where we then were, on the road to Acapulco. The party that ascended After a day's rest at Cuernavaca our party set out again on the journey to the great caves of Mexico. We had proceeded but a few miles when we were stopped, as before, by a guard and notified that
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Return of the Army-marriage-ordered to the Pacific coast-crossing the Isthmus-arrival at San Francisco (search)
embraced more than fifty officers who afterwards became generals on one side or the other in the rebellion, many of them holding high commands. All the older officers, who became conspicuous in the rebellion, I had also served with and known in Mexico: Lee, J. E. Johnston, A. S. Johnston, Holmes, [Paul] Herbert and a number of others on the Confederate side; McCall, Mansfield, Phil. Kearney and others on the National side. The acquaintance thus formed was of immense service to me in the war o of the press of the country, clothed General Lee with just such qualities, but I had known him personally, and knew that he was mortal; and it was just as well that I felt this. The treaty of peace was at last ratified, and the evacuation of Mexico by United States troops was ordered. Early in June the troops in the City of Mexico began to move out. Many of them, including the brigade to which I belonged, were assembled at Jalapa, above the vomito, to await the arrival of transports at Ver
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