Browsing named entities in Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for West Point (Kentucky, United States) or search for West Point (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, General Fremont in command-movement against Belmont-battle of Belmont-a narrow escape- after the battle (search)
olk's command, arranged for permission to bury our dead at Belmont and also commenced negotiations for the exchange of prisoners. When our men went to bury their dead, before they were allowed to land they were conducted below the point where the enemy had engaged our transports. Some of the officers expressed a desire to see the field; but the request was refused with the statement that we had no dead there. While on the truce-boat I mentioned to an officer, whom I had known both at West Point and in the Mexican war, that I was in the cornfield near their troops when they passed; that I had been on horseback and had worn a soldier's overcoat at the time. This officer was on General Polk's staff. He said both he and the general had seen me and that Polk had said to his men, There is a Yankee; you may try your marksmanship on him if you wish, but nobody fired at me. Belmont was severely criticised in the North as a wholly unnecessary battle, barren of results, or the possibi
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, General Halleck in command-commanding the district of Cairo-movement on Fort Henry- capture of Fort Henry (search)
a shot across the bow as a signal to come no farther. I would then take a steamer and, with my staff and occasionally a few other officers, go down to receive the party. There were several officers among them whom I had known before, both at West Point and in Mexico. Seeing these officers who had been educated for the profession of arms, both at school and in actual war, which is a far more efficient training, impressed me with the great advantage the South possessed over the North at the bee a general as Smith, I renewed my request to go to St. Louis on what I deemed important military business. The leave was granted, but not graciously. I had known General Halleck but very slightly in the old army, not having met him either at West Point or during the Mexican war. I was received with so little cordiality that I perhaps stated the object of my visit with less clearness than I might have done, and I had not uttered many sentences before I was cut short as if my plan was preposter