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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The relief of Knoxville-headquarters moved to Nashville-visiting Knoxville-cipher dispatches --Withholding orders (search)
dvantage, and in collecting all necessary supplies so as to be ready to claim a due share of the enemy's attention upon the appearance of the first good weather in the spring. I expected to retain the command I then had, and prepared myself for the campaign against Atlanta. I also had great hopes of having a campaign made against Mobile from the Gulf. I expected after Atlanta fell to occupy that place permanently, and to cut off Lee's army from the West by way of the road running through Augusta to Atlanta and thence south-west. I was preparing to hold Atlanta with a small garrison, and it was my expectation to push through to Mobile if that city was in our possession: if not, to Savannah; and in this manner to get possession of the only east and west railroad that would then be left to the enemy. But the spring campaign against Mobile was not made. The Army of the Ohio had been getting supplies over Cumberland Gap until their animals had nearly all starved. I now determined
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sherman's campaign in Georgia-siege of Atlanta --death of General McPherson-attempt to capture Andersonville-capture of Atlanta (search)
gades under Fuller and Mersy they took 351 prisoners, representing forty-nine different regiments, eight brigades and three divisions; and brought back eight battle flags from the enemy. It was during this battle that McPherson, while passing from one column to another, was instantly killed. In his death the army lost one of its ablest, purest and best generals. [Kenner] Garrard had been sent out with his cavalry to get upon the railroad east of Atlanta and to cut it in the direction of Augusta. He was successful in this, and returned about the time of the battle. [Lovell H.] Rousseau had also come up from Tennessee with a small division of cavalry, having crossed the Tennessee River about Decatur and made a raid into Alabama. Finally, when hard pressed, he had come in, striking the railroad in rear of Sherman, and reported to him about this time. The battle of the 22d is usually known as the Battle of Atlanta, although the city did not fall into our hands until the 2d of S
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The campaign in Georgia-Sherman's March to the sea-war anecdotes-the March on Savannah- investment of Savannah-capture of Savannah (search)
oops to act upon Savannah, whilst you move on Augusta. I should like to hear from you, however, in sure of finding provisions and ammunition at Augusta, or Columbus, Georgia, I can march to Milledgeville, and compel Hood to give up Augusta or Macon, and then turn on the other. * * * If you cannage to take the Savannah River as high up as Augusta, or the Chattahoochee as far up as Columbus, in your telegram, so as to threaten Macon and Augusta equally. Whichever was abandoned by the enem wing. Slocum was in command, and threatened Augusta as the point to which he was moving, but he wl farther off so as to make it look as though Augusta was the point they were aiming for. They movegagement, in which Wheeler was driven towards Augusta, thus giving the idea that Sherman was probab final objective. Bragg had now been sent to Augusta with some troops. Wade Hampton was there alsdition will be filled by holding Savannah and Augusta, or by holding any other port to the east of
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sherman's March North-Sheridan ordered to Lynchburg-Canby ordered to move against Mobile-movements of Schofield and Thomas-capture of Columbia, South Carolina-Sherman in the Carolinas (search)
uld be determined upon. The right wing went from Pocotaligo, and the left from about Hardeeville on the Savannah River, both columns taking a pretty direct route for Columbia. The cavalry, however, were to threaten Charleston on the right, and Augusta on the left. On the 15th of January Fort Fisher had fallen, news of which Sherman had received before starting out on his march. We already had New Bern and had soon Wilmington, whose fall followed that of Fort Fisher; as did other points oCharleston was evacuated on the 18th of February [17th], and Foster garrisoned the place. Wilmington was captured on the 22d. Columbia and Cheraw farther north, were regarded as so secure from invasion that the wealthy people of Charleston and Augusta had sent much of their valuable property to these two points to be stored. Among the goods sent there were valuable carpets, tons of old Madeira, silverware, and furniture. I am afraid much of these goods fell into the hands of our troops. Th