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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 345 345 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 22 22 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 13 13 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 11 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 9 9 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 9 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 8 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary. You can also browse the collection for June 24th or search for June 24th in all documents.

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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, III. June, 1861 (search)
the letter. We removed them one by one; and as we progressed, he said with an impatient smile, it is always sure to be the last one. And so it was. Having found it, he departed immediately; and soon after I saw him on his way to church. June 23 Every day as soon as the first press of business is over, the Secretary comes out of his office and taps me on the shoulder, and invites me to ride with him in quest of a house. We go to those offered for rent; but he cannot be suited. June 24 To-day I was startled by the announcement from Col. Bledsoe that he would resign soon, and that it was his purpose to ask the President to appoint me chief of the bureau in his place. I said I preferred a less conspicuous position-and less labor-but thanked him. He said he had no influence with the Secretary — an incontrovertible fact; and that he thought he should return to the University. While we were speaking, the President's messenger came in with a note to the colonel; I did not
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 16 (search)
nently by Gen. Bragg. There are charges against Beauregard. It is said the Yankee army might have been annihilated at Shiloh, if Beauregard had fought a little longer. June 23 And Gen. Johnston, I learn, has had his day. And Magruder is on sick leave. He is too open in his censures of the late Secretary of War. But Gen. Huger comes off scotfree; he has always had the confidence of Mr. Benjamin, and used to send the flag of truce to Fortress Monroe as often as could be desired. June 24 Gen. Lee's plan works like a charm Although I have daily orders from Mr. Randolph to send persons beyond our lines, yet the precautions of Lee most effectually prevent any spies from knowing anything about his army. Even the Adjutant-General, S. Cooper, don't know how many regiments are ordered into Virginia, or where they are stationed. Officers returning from furlough, cannot ascertain in the Adjutant-General's office where their regiments are! They are referred to me for passports
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXVII. June, 1863 (search)
inforcements, made a more furious attempt than ever to take Vicksburg by assault, and was repulsed disastrously. His loss is estimated at between 7000 and 10,000 men. Pemberton is now greatly praised by many people, while some of our officers shake their heads and say he is fighting with the halter around his neck, and that if he were not to fight and hold out to the last, his own men would hang him. Notwithstanding the immense amount of goods brought in daily, the prices keep high. June 24 We have nothing additional from Vicksburg or from the Potomac, but there is a rumor of fighting near Leesburg. The first installment of Winchester prisoners reached the city yesterday, 1600 in number, and there are over 4000 more on the way. So much for Milroy's 2000 or 30001 To-day the President desired the Secretary of War to send him all the correspondence with Gen. Johnston, as he intends to write him a confidential letter touching reinforcements, and he wishes to inform him
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 40 (search)
against whom grave charges have been made frequently, of speculation, etc., but was defended by the Commissary-General. Mr. Harvey, president Danville Railroad, telegraphs to Gen. Bragg to send troops without delay, or the road will be ruined by the raiders. Bragg sends the paper to the Secretary of War, saying there are no troops but those in the army of Gen. Lee, and the reserves, the latter now being called out. Ten days ago, Mr. Secretary Seddon had fair warning about this road. June 24 Hot and hazy; dry. The news (in the papers) of the cutting of our railroad communications with the South creates fresh apprehension among the croakers. But at 12 M. we had news of the recovery of the Weldon Road last evening, and the capture of 500 more prisoners. We have nothing from the south side raiders since their work of destruction at Burkesville, cutting the Danville Road. Mr. Hunter sheds tears over his losses in Essex, the burning of his mill, etc. But he had be