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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 355 3 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 147 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 137 13 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 135 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 129 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 125 13 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 108 38 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 85 7 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 84 12 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary. You can also browse the collection for Banks or search for Banks in all documents.

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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 8 (search)
erry. That is the cavalry again! The spies here cannot inform the enemy of the movements of our mounted men, which are always made with celerity. October 20 A lady, just from Washington, after striving in vain to procure an interview with the Secretary of War, left with me the programme of the enemy's contemplated movements. She was present with the family of Gen. Dix at a party, and heard their purposes disclosed. They meditate an advance immediately, with 200,000 men. The head of Banks's column is to cross near Leesburg; and when over, a movement upon our flank is intended from the vicinity of Arlington Heights. This is truly a formidable enterprise, if true. We have not 70,000 effective men in Northern Virginia. The lady is in earnest-and remains here. I wrote down the above information and sent it to the President; and understood that dispatches were transmitted immediately to Gen. Johnston, by telegraph. The lady likewise spoke of a contemplated movement by s
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 15 (search)
for a crop of tobacco. This is a holy cause we are embarked in, worthy to die for. The British Minister, Lord Lyons, has embarked for England, to report to his government that the rebellion is on its last legs, and must speedily succumb. He is no prophet, or the son of a prophet. May 22 There is lightning in the Northwest, and the deep thunder of avenging guns is heard at Washington! Gen. Jackson, sent thither by Gen. Lee, is sweeping everything before him, defeating Shields, Banks, Fremont, and one or two other Yankee major. generals, with his little corps d'armee! And his coadjutor, Ewell, is worthy of his companionship. He has swept them out of the valley, scattering their hosts like quails before the fowler! They fly in every direction; and the powers at Washington are trembling for the safety of their own capital. Glorious Jackson! and he gives, as is justly due, the glory to God. May 23 Oh, the extortioners! Meats of all kinds are selling at 50 cts. p
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 18 (search)
esting money in real estate for the first time, which is evidence that they have no faith in the ultimate redemption of Confederate money. August 27 Huzza for Gen. Stuart! He has made another circumvention of the enemy, getting completely in Pope's rear, and destroying many millions worth of stores, etc. August 28 Pope's coat was captured, and all his papers. The braggart is near his end. August 29 Bloody fighting is going on at Manassas. All the news is good for us. It appears that Pope, in his consummate egotism, refused to believe that he had been outwitted, and pitched into our corps and divisions, believing them to be merely brigades and regiments. He has been terribly cut up. August 30 Banks, by the order of Pope, has burnt 400 Yankee cars loaded with quartermaster's and commissary stores. But our soldiers have fared sumptuously on the enemy's provisions, and captured clothing enough for half the army. August 31 Fighting every day at Manassas.
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 22 (search)
gned to brigades, and this may have operated on Randolph as an emetic. There are two war steamers at Charleston from abroad; one a Frenchman, the other an Englishman. Gen. Beauregard entertained the officers of the first the other day. Gen. Banks has sailed down the coast on an expedition, the nature of which, no doubt, will be developed soon. December 11 Gen. Lee dispatched this morning early that the enemy were constructing three pontoon bridges, and that firing had commenced o5,000. The Washington papers congratulate themselves on the escape of their army, and say it might have been easily captured by Lee. They propose, now, going into winter quarters. We have nothing further from North Carolina or Mississippi. Gen. Banks's expedition had passed Hilton Head. A Mr. Bunch, British Consul, has written an impudent letter to the department, alleging that an Irishman, unnaturalized, is forcibly detained in one of our camps. He says his letters have not been answe
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXVII. June, 1863 (search)
idates of its citizens according to qualifications, recommendations, etc. It appeared that North Carolina stood first on the list, Virginia next, Georgia next, and so on. Oh that we could get something decisive from Vicksburg! If Grant's and Banks's armies should be destroyed, I think there would be some prospect of peace at an early day. For, if Lincoln should persist in a prolongation of the war, the probabilities would be the expulsion of the enemy from the Mississippi Valley and the re, Gen. Taylor (son of Zachary Taylor) had stormed and taken the enemy's fortifications at Berwick's Bay, with the bayonet. We took. 1000 prisoners, 10 large cannon, and many stores. Also that we had taken Thibbodauxville, and have thus cut off Banks from New Orleans. 5 O'Clock P. M.-The city is now in good humor, but not wild with exultation. We have what seems pretty authentic intelligence of the taking of Harrisburg, the capital of Pennsylvania, the City of York, etc. etc. This comes
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 29 (search)
within the fortifications; and that but few of the men even thought of such a contingency as a surrender, and did not know it had taken place until the next day (5th of July), when they were ordered to march out and lay down their arms. He adds that Gen. Pemberton kept himself very close, and was rarely seen by the troops, and was never known to go out to the works until he went out to surrender. Major-Gen. D. Maury writes from Mobile, to the President, that he apprehends an attack from Banks, and asks instructions relative to the removal of 15,000 non-combatants from the city. He says Forts Gaines and Morgan are provisioned for six months, and that the land fortifications are numerous and formidable. He asks for 20,000 men to garrison them. The President instructs the Secretary, that when the purpose of the enemy is positively known, it will be time enough to remove the women, children, etc.; but that the defenses should be completed, and everything in readiness. But where t
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXIX. August, 1863 (search)
aid. speculators swarming. God helps me to-day. conscripts. Memminger shipping gold to Europe. our women and children making straw bonnets. attack on Charleston. Robert Tyler as a financier. enemy throw large shells into Charleston, five and a half miles. diabolical scheme. Gen. Lee has returned to the army. August 1 The President learns, by a dispatch from Gen. Hardee, of Mississippi, that information has reached him, which he considers authentic, that Gen. Taylor has beaten Banks in Louisiana, taking 6000 prisoners; but then it is said that Taylor has fallen back. I see by Mr. Memminger's correspondence that he has been sending $1,000,000 in sterling exchange, with the concurrence of the President and the Secretary of War, to Gen. Johnston and Gov. Pettus. What can this mean? Perhaps he is buying stores, etc. Gen. Pemberton, it is said, has proclaimed a thirty days furlough to all his paroled army — a virtue of necessity, as they had all gone to their homes
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXX. September, 1863 (search)
u have done the country. I wish to say a word further. When you first reached the vicinity of Vicksburg I thought you should do what you finally didmarch the troops across the neck, run the batteries with the transports, and thus go below; and I never had any faith, except a general hope that you knew better than I, that the Yazoo Pass expedition and the like could succeed. When you got below and took Port Gibson, Grand Gulf, and vicinity, I thought you should go down the river and join Gen. Banks; and when you turned northward, east of the Big Black, I feared it was a mistake. I now wish to make the personal acknowledgment that you were right and I was wrong. A. Lincoln. If Pemberton had acted differently, if the movement northward had been followed by disaster, then what would Mr. Lincoln have written to Grant? Success is the only standard of merit in a general. September 10 A Mr. J. C. Jones has addressed a letter to the President asking permission to run the block
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 32 (search)
en. Lee's reputation as a great captain will be ruined, if the blockaderun-ners be allowed to continue to give information to the enemy of all his movements. October 22 Gen. Wheeler has taken 700 of the enemy's cavalry in East Tennessee, 6 cannon, 50 wagons, commissary stores, etc. Per contra, the steamer Venus, with bacon, from Nassau, got aground trying to enter the port of Wilmington, and ship and cargo were lost. There is a rumor that Gen. Taylor, transMis-sissippi, has captured Gen. Banks, his staff, and sixteen regiments. This, I fear, is not well authenticated. A poor woman yesterday applied to a merchant in Carey Street to purchase a barrel of flour. The price he demanded was $70. My God! exclaimed she, how can I pay such prices? I have seven children; what shall I do? I don't know, madam, said he, coolly, unless you eat your children. Such is the power of cupidity — it transforms men into demons. And if this spirit prevails throughout the country, a j
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXXII. November, 1863 (search)
the impressing agents in his department. Gen. J. disclaims the responsibility, inasmuch as the agents referred to act under orders from the Commissary-General or Secretary of War. November 19 Miss Harriet H. Fort, of Baltimore, has arrived via Accomac and Northampton Counties, with a complete drawing of all the defenses of Baltimore. The Medical Purveyor's Guards have petitioned the Secretary for higher pay. They get now $1500 per annum, and say the city watchmen get $2300. Gens. Banks and Taylor in the West are corresponding and wrangling about the exchange of prisoners — and the cartel is to be abrogated, probably. The Governor of Mississippi (Clark) telegraphs the President that the Legislature (in session) is indignant at the military authorities for impressing slaves. The President telegraphs back that the order was to prevent them falling into the lines of the enemy, and none others were to be disturbed. November 20 We have reports of some successes to-
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