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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, V. August, 1861 (search)
tifications. Our banners are advanced to Munson's Hill, in sight of Washington. The Northern President and his cabinet may see our army, with good glasses, from the roof of the White House. It is said they sleep in their boots; and that some of them leave the city every night, for fear of being captured before morning. Generals Johnston, Wise, and Floyd are sending here, daily, the Union traitors they discover to be in communication with the enemy. We have a Yankee member of Congress, Ely, taken at Manassas; he rode out to witness the sport of killing rebels as terriers kill rats, but was caught in the trap himself. He says his people were badly whipped; and he hopes they will give up the job of subjugation as a speculation that won't pay. Most of the prisoners speak thus while in confinement. August 29 We have intelligence from the North that immense preparations are being made for our destruction; and some of our people begin to say, that inasmuch as we did not follow
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 10 (search)
turns to the Eastern Shore. Winder's detectives. Kentucky secedes. Judge Perkins's resolution. Dibble goes North. waiting for great Britain to do something. Mr. Ely, the Yankee M. C. December 1 The people here begin to murmur at the idea that they are questioned about their loyalty, and often arrested, by Baltimore pett and saying that he would explain the grounds upon which they were permitted to depart. I can only give the number registered in this office. December 25 Mr. Ely, the Yankee member of Congress, who has been in confinement here since the battle of Manassas, has been exchanged for Mr. Faulkner, late Minister to France, who was captured on his return from Europe. Mr. Ely smiled at the brown paper on which I had written his passport. I told him it was Southern manufacture, and although at present in a crude condition, it was in the process of improvement, and that necessity was the mother of invention. The necessity imposed on us by the blockade woul