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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 35 (search)
a sheltered part of the garden, and I planted twenty-four grains of early-sweet corn, some cabbage seed, tomatoes, beets, and egg-plants in my little hotbed — a flour barrel sawed in two, which I can bring into the house when the weather is cold. I pray God the season may continue mild, else there must be much suffering. And yet no beggars are seen in the streets. What another month will develope, I know not; the fortitude of the people, so far, is wonderful. Major-Gen. Sam. Jones, Dublin, Va., is at loggerheads with Lieut.-Gen. Longstreet about some regiments the latter keeps in East Tennessee. Gen. J. says Averill is preparing to make another raid on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, the saltworks, the mines, etc.; and if he is charged with the defense, he must have at least all his regiments. He gets his orders from Gen. Cooper, A. and I. G., who will probably give him what he wants. January 26 Gen. Lee recommends the formation of several more brigades of cavalry,
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 46 (search)
reported one division of the enemy's cavalry, under Gen. Custer, coming up the valley, and two divisions, under Gen. Torbert, moving through Chester Gap, with four pieces of artillery and thirty wagons. On the 22d, Rosser attacked Custer's division, nine miles from Harrisonburg, and drove it back, capturing forty prisoners. This morning, Torbert attacked Lomax near Gordonsville, and was repulsed and severely punished. He is retreating, and Lomax preparing to follow. R. E. Lee. Dublin, December 20th, 1861. A dispatch from Gen. Breckinridge to-day, dated at Mount Airy, sixteen miles west of Wytheville, says he had fought the enemy for two days, successfully, near Marion. The enemy had retired from his front; but whether they were retreating to East Tennessee or not, he had not ascertained. Charleston, December 22d, 1864. To Gen. S. Cooper. On the 16th inst., the enemy, 800 strong, occupied Pollard. After burning the government and railroad buildings, they retired