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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 611 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 134 60 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 70 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 48 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 48 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 41 41 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 28 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary. You can also browse the collection for Deep Bottom (Virginia, United States) or search for Deep Bottom (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 40 (search)
ays, his campaign will be noted a failure, even in the North. We learn to-day that gold is now at $2.15 in the North. The raiders are beginning to pay the penalty of their temerity; besides Hampton's fight with them, on this side the James River, we learn that W. H. F. Lee has struck them a blow on the south side. June 28 Bright and cool — a little rain last night. The Departmental Battalion is still kept out. They have built a line of fortifications four miles long — to Deep Bottom from near Chaffin's Farm. The Secretary of War intimates that these clerks are kept out by Gen. R. E. Lee. The superintendent of the Central Railroad informed the Secretary of War to-day that the road would be reopened to Staunton on Thursday (day after to-morrow), such is the slight damage done by the enemy. He asks that the bridge near Hanover Junction be defended, that being the only part of the road that can be much injured by a small raiding party. And he don't want the papers
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 42 (search)
weather has ruined nearly everything else in the garden. August 9 Very hot; very dry; very dusty. The President has directed the late Gen. (now Lieut.--Col.) Pemberton to organize a mortar and cavalry force to dislodge the enemy from Deep Bottom, on this side of the river, and to select three or four batteries to render the navigation of the James River difficult and dangerous. Col. P. says he must have some 1500 cavalry, etc. Letters from Mr. McRae, our agent abroad, show that os. Such is the avarice of man. Such is war. And such the greed of extortioners, even in the midst of famine-and famine in the midst of plenty! August 14 Hot and dry. Rumors of a fight down the river yesterday, driving the enemy from Deep Bottom, and grounding of the Richmond. Guns were heard, and I suppose we made a demonstration both by land and water. Cavalry (Hampton's) still pass northward. They ride as if they grew to the horses. As they trot past, they can be seen cuttin