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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 942 140 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 719 719 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 641 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 465 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 407 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 319 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 301 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 274 274 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 224 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 199 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary. You can also browse the collection for Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 5 document sections:

J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXVII. June, 1863 (search)
lly his retreat, and the capture of the Federal forces at Winchester. Later in the day the New York Herald of the 17th inst. was received by the flag of truce boat. I now quote from it: Fortifications are being rapidly erected all along the north bank of the Susquehanna, and Gen. McClellan or Gen. Franklin has been called for to head the State troops. Reports from Harrisburg. Harrisburg, Pa., June 16th.-Midnight.-Rebel cavalry today occupied Littletown, eleven miles from Gettysburg, but at last accounts had not advanced beyond that point. The rebel officers at Chambersburg stated that they were only waiting for infantry to move forward. The authorities are inclined to believe, however, that they will not move farther North. The farmers in the valley are sending their horses and cattle into the mountains. The rebels are gathering up all the negroes that can be found. Private property has been respected. They burned the railroad bridge across Scot
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 29 (search)
ing furiously. This would have prostrated the tender boys with illness. July 7 It appears that the fighting near Gettysburg began on Wednesday, July 1st, continued until Sunday, the 5th, and perhaps longer. Up to Friday the Northern papers cle Yankee force was engaged in the last three days fighting. The number — is estimated at 175,000. The hills around Gettysburg are said to be covered with the dead and wounded of the Yankee Army of the Potomac. The fighting of these four days But the absence of dispatches from Gen. Lee himself is beginning to create distrust, and doubts of decisive success at Gettysburg. His couriers may have been captured, or he may be delaying to announce something else he has in contemplation. Thasants of Europe rarely have any meat, and in Hindostan, never. Col. Bradley T. Johnson, who commanded a brigade at Gettysburg, writes that on the first day we carried everything before us, capturing 8000 prisoners and losing but few men; the err
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXIX. August, 1863 (search)
There will probably not be so many prisoners taken as usual, since the alleged cruel treatment of our men now taken at Gettysburg, and the sending of Gen. Morgan to the Ohio Penitentiary, and shaving his head, by order of Gen. Burnside. A dispatproach of the army of the enemy, menacing communications with the Potomac, necessitating a concentration of our army at Gettysburg. Hill became engaged with a superior force of the enemy on the 1st July, but Ewell, coming up by the Harrisburg road, participated in the engagement, and the enemy were driven through Gettysburg with heavy loss, including about 5000 prisoners and several pieces of artillery. The enemy retired to a high range of hills, south and east of the town. On the 2d as could be moved, and part Of the arms collected on the field, were ordered to Williamsport. His army remained at Gettysburg during the 4th, and began to retire at night, taking with it about 4000 prisoners, nearly 2000 having been previously p
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXX. September, 1863 (search)
the reports about a whole fleet of Confederate gun-boats having been built or bought in England are not well founded. Major Ferguson has also (several have done so before him) made charges against Major Huse, the agent of Col. Gorgas, Chief of Ordnance. Mr. McRae thinks the charges cannot be substantiated. We have tidings of the bursting of the Blakely gun at Charleston. I fear this involves the fall of Charleston. Still Beauregard is there. Gen. Pickett's division (decimated at Gettysburg) is to remain in this vicinity — and Jenkins's and Wise's brigades will leave. The hour now seems a dark one. But we must conquer or die. It is said a deserter has already gone over from our lines and given information to the enemy of the large number of troops detached from the Army of Virginia. No doubt Gen. Meade will take advantage of their absence, and advance on Richmond again. Yet I am told the very name of RichmonA is a terror to the foe. September 13 A letter from Ge
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 32 (search)
Xxxi. October, 1863 Suffering of our wounded at Gettysburg. prisoners from the battle of Chickamauga. Charleston. policy in the Southwest. from Gen. Bragg. letter from President Davis. religious revival. departure of the President for the Southwest. about General Bragg. movement of mechanics and non-producersies until next year. I doubt whether the Yankees will desire another winter campaign in Virginia. The papers contain the following account of sufferings at Gettysburg, and in the Federal prisons: A lady from the vicinity of Gettysburg writes: July 18th- We have been visiting the battle-field, and have done all wGettysburg writes: July 18th- We have been visiting the battle-field, and have done all we can for the wounded there. Since then we have sent another party, who came upon a camp of wounded Confederates in a wood between the hills. Through this wood quite a large creek runs. This camp contained between 200 and 300 wounded men, in every stage of suffering; two well men among them as nurses. Most of them had frightfu