Browsing named entities in William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. You can also browse the collection for William Wallace or search for William Wallace in all documents.

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ith a stepmother. Mrs. Edwards, statement, Aug. 3, 1887. She came to live with her oldest sister, Elizabeth, who was the wife of Lincoln's colleague in the Legislature, Ninian W. Edwards. She had two other sisters, Frances, married to Dr. William Wallace, and Anne, who afterwards became the wife of C. M. Smith, a prominent and wealthy merchant. They all resided in Springfield. She was of the average height, weighing when I first saw her about a hundred and thirty pounds. She was rather c Lincoln would have accepted him. The unfortunate attitude she felt bound to maintain between these two young men ended in a spell of sickness. Douglas, still hopeful, was warm in the race, but the lady's physician,--her brother-in-law,--Dr. William Wallace, to whom she confided the real cause of her illness, saw Douglas and induced him to end his pursuit, Mrs. Harriett Chapman, statement, Nov. 8, 1887. which he did with great reluctance. If Miss Todd intended by her flirtation with Do
ttle of them as a married couple till the spring of 1843, when the husband writes to his friend Speed, who had been joined to his black-eyed Fanny a little over a year, with regard to his life as a married man. Are you possessing houses and lands, he writes, and oxen and asses and men-servants and maid-servants, and begetting sons and daughters? We are not keeping house, but boarding at the Globe Tavern, which is very well kept now by a widow lady of the name of Beck. Our room (the same Dr. Wallace occupied there) and boarding only costs us four dollars a week. Gaining a livelihood was slow and discouraging business with him, for we find him in another letter apologizing for his failure to visit Kentucky, because, he says, I am so poor and make so little headway in the world that I drop back in a month of idleness as much as I gain in a year's sowing. But by dint of untiring efforts and the recognition of influential friends he managed through rare frugality to move along. In his