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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 289 3 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 50 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 24 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 14 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 8 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography. You can also browse the collection for Grover Cleveland or search for Grover Cleveland in all documents.

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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 16: (search)
had been cast, and General Logan's nomination for Vice-President followed by acclamation. The Democratic convention met at Chicago on July 6, and nominated Grover Cleveland for President and Thomas A. Hendricks for Vice-President. After the announcement of the nominations made at Chicago the people of Washington gave a magnificr and he invited a search-light investigation of his whole life. He defied the opposition in an aggressive campaign against the nominees of the Democratic party-Cleveland and Hendricks-but would not stoop to the personalities so wantonly and fatally indulged in during that campaign. He held the nominees responsible for the princi. When the returns were in and the result was announced, it was evident that the contest had been very close. Many good men doubted seriously the election of Cleveland and Hendricks if a fair count could be secured. At first Mr. Blaine thought of contesting the election and demanding a recount, especially in the State of New