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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 11: (search)
Central Railroad, with no division fences, and it was a most beautiful location. Here we spent many happy years during the interim between the sessions of Congress. I was obliged to dispose of this home after General Logan's death, and have since had the painful experience of seeing it fall before the march of the resistless commercialism of Chicago. We had not gotten our home settled when that fearful holocaust of October 9, 1871, swallowed all of Chicago north of Twelfth Street to Lincoln Park. We had friends calling on Sunday evening, when we heard the continuous ringing of the fire-bell and went out on top of the house, where there was an observatory, to try to locate the fire. In the northwest we saw the heavens lighted up by the flames, which were consuming the wooden houses and lumber in the lumber districts of northwest Chicago. It seemed many miles away; so, after watching it for hours, we descended to our rooms, our friends departed, and we retired. In the early mor
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 16: (search)
rit to execute such a statue as he desired. Therefore the committee indulged him very much in his delays in furnishing the model of his conception of the statue. Finally he succeeded in making the great statue which is erected in Michigan Avenue Park, on the lake front in Chicago. It was unveiled by John A. Logan III, grandson of General Logan, on July 22, 1903, on the anniversary of the fall of McPherson in the battle of Atlanta, July 22, 1864. No work of this illustrious artist has been mo Mrs. Mary Logan Tucker. The family of Major Logan was then in Europe and were not present at the unveiling. It was infinitely gratifying to me to have been spared to witness the completion of Saint-Gaudens's equestrian statue in Michigan Avenue Park, Chicago, erected by the State and personal friends of Illinois, and the.one in Logan Circle in the national capital erected by Congress, the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, the Grand Army of the Republic, and personal friends as a tribute t