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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 5: Round about Richmond. (search)
presence, not that it was wanted, and said no more. My intention was to suggest that we leave Magruder to look after McClellan, and march, as proposed to Jackson a few days before, through the Vallelan's landing on the peninsula, the Confederate army on that line was commanded by Major-General J. Bankhead Magruder, and consisted of eleven thousand men of all arms. The defensive line was pitchedered one hundred and eight thousand of all arms, including the garrison at Fortress Monroe. Magruder was speedily reinforced by a detachment from Huger's army, and afterwards by Early's brigade ofThe divisions of G. W. Smith and D. H. Hill were ordered by the Yorktown and Williamsburg road, Magruder's and Longstreet's by the Hampton and Lee's Mill road, Stuart's cavalry to cover both routes. Anticipating this move as the possible result of operations against his lower line, General Magruder had constructed a series of earthworks about two miles in front of Williamsburg. The main work,
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 6: the battle of Williamsburg. (search)
ed a move of part of McClellan's army by transports to the head of York River, to cut his line of march towards Richmond, and conceived it important to have a strong force at that point in time to meet and check the move. To that end he ordered Magruder to march at two A. M. on the 5th of May with D. R. Jones's and McLaws's divisions, to be followed by the divisions of G. W. Smith and D. H. Hill; Longstreet's division to cover the movement of his trains and defend Stuart's cavalry in case of selin. On the same day, Johnston's army was collected near Barhamville. General Whiting, with Hood's brigade and part of Hampton's, engaged the advance of Franklin's command and forced it back. This cleared our route of march towards Richmond, Smith's and Magruder's divisions by the road to New Kent Court-House, Hill's and Longstreet's nearer the Chickahominy. General McClellan's plans were laid according to strict rules of strategy, but he was not quick or forcible in handling his troops.
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 7: Seven Pines, or Fair Oaks. (search)
alry extending on the left and front to the lower Rappahannock and Fredericksburg. The right wing, D. H. Hill's and Longstreet's divisions, under Longstreet, from James River to White Oak Swamp; the left under G. W. Smith. Smith's division and Magruder's command from White Oak Swamp, extending thence to the Mechanicsville pike, with Jackson a hundred miles away in the Shenandoah Valley. After careful study of the works and armaments at Drury's Bluff, I ventured the suggestion that we recr as well as the line left vacant by Longstreet's division. At nightfall the troops took up the march for their several assigned positions. Before dark General Johnston called a number of his officers together for instructions,--viz., Smith, Magruder, Stuart, and Longstreet. When we were assembled, General Johnston announced later information: that McDowell's line of march had been changed,--that he was going north. Following the report of this information, General Smith proposed that the
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 8: Sequels of Seven Pines. (search)
to the York River Railroad, facing east, his right near Fair Oaks Station. Besides his division of ten thousand, he had Magruder's and other commands of fresh troops near him,--twenty thousand. My left lay near Smith's right, the line extending par aid as might be drawn to us during the battle. The plan proposed could only be considered under the hypothesis that Magruder would come in as the pivotal point, and, upon having the enemy's line fully exposed, would find the field fine for his bd's brigade, and Howard by Meagher's, and the firing extended along my line as far as the return front of my right. But Magruder was not on the field to seize the opportunity for his artillery. He was nowhere near the battle,--had not been called. mmander seemed to forget. At the same time he wrote me,--I have directed Whiting to take close defensive relations with Magruder. At any rate, that was absolutely necessary to enable a good defence to be made whilst you are pivoting on Whiting's po
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 10: fighting along the Chickahominy. (search)
ing pursuit, he received a similar report from General Magruder, coupled with the statement that he was prepar. H. Hill, crossing the river at Grapevine Bridge, Magruder to join pursuit along the direct line of retreat, e avenues of approach from Richmond. On the 29th, Magruder in pursuit came upon Sumner's (Second) corps at Al as the only defending forces. At Savage Station, Magruder came upon them and again joined battle, but his foaffair, therefore, against odds was too strong for Magruder, so that he was forced back without important resuapproached, to warrant more aggressive battle. Magruder's march had been directed to succor Holmes. In hnfusion, abandoning two guns. Earlier in the day, Magruder's column had been ordered by a long detour to suppus, and caused the Confederate commander to divert Magruder's march to support that point, through which a res endanger our rear at Frayser's Farm. After night Magruder was called to relieve the troops on the front of m
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 11: battle of Malvern Hill. (search)
use of their artillery a mistake and defeat for Lee's Army the campaign as a whole a great success, but it should have been far greater McClellan's retreat showed him well equipped in the science of War review of the campaign Jackson's and Magruder's misunderstanding moral effect of the gunboats on the James River-there should be a gunboat in every family. At Malvern Hill, hardly a league away from Frayser's, now left to silence save for the moans of the unfortunate fallen, and standin quarter. General Jackson sent word in reply that he had other important duty to perform. Referring to Jackson's orders of the 29th, General Lee wrote General Magruder: Headquarters Department of Northern Virginia, June 29, 1862. Major-General J. B. Magruder, Commanding Division: General,-- I regret much that you have made so little progress to-day in pursuit of the enemy. In order to reap the fruits of our victory the pursuit should be most vigorous. I must urge you, then, again to p
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
y was about. They were the first to report the enemy's retreat towards James River. Orders were given for Jackson to follow on the direct line of retreat, also Magruder and Huger. My command was ordered around through the outskirts of Richmond by the Darbytown road to interpose between McClellan's army and the James River, abounine miles. We were in position on the evening of the 29th of June, and stood in front of the enemy all of the 30th, fighting a severe battle in the afternoon. Magruder and Huger got up after night, and Jackson on the morning of the 1st. After the battle of the 1st, Jackson, Magruder, and Huger were ordered in direct pursuit alMagruder, and Huger were ordered in direct pursuit along the route of retreat, my command by the longer route of Nance's Store. Jackson's column and mine met on the evening of the 3d near Westover, the enemy's new position. At the Second Manassas my command relieved the pressure against Jackson. He called on me for relief by a route that would have taken an hour or an hour and