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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 58 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 37 3 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 28 28 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 17 17 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 9 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia. You can also browse the collection for Franklin (Tennessee, United States) or search for Franklin (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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pied night and day with my dear B., who has been again very dangerously ill, with erysipelas in his wound. We are troubled about our son J., who has just been ordered to North Carolina; but we have no right to complain, as his health is good, and his position has hitherto been very pleasant. January 31st, 1863. We are in statu quo, and our armies quiet. The Northern army seems to be in commotion. Burnside has resigned, and fighting Joe Hooker has been put in his place. Sumner and Franklin have also resigned their grand divisions. Pourquoi? Won't the men advance? Perhaps the Stafford mud has been more than a match for them. Burnside had issued but a few days ago an address to his men, saying they were about to strike the final blow at the rebellion. All was in readiness, and the Grand army moved forward; just then the rain descended and the floods came, and, attempting to cross the Rappahannock ten miles above Fredericksburg, ambulances, wagons, big guns and all stuck in