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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
gement with the enemy at Haw's Shop. On the 29th and 30th we advanced, with heavy skirmishing, to the Hanover Court-House and Cold Harbor road, and developed the enemy's position north of the Chickahominy. Late on the evening of the last day the enemy came out and attacked our left, but was repulsed with very considerable loss. An attack was immediately ordered by General Meade along his whole line, which resulted in driving the enemy from a part of his intrenched skirmish line. On the 31st General Wilson's division of cavalry destroyed the railroad bridges over the South Anna River, after defeating the enemy's cavalry. General Sheridan, on the same day, reached Cold Harbor, and held it until relieved by the Sixth Corps and General Smith's command, which had just arrived, via White House, from General Butler's army. On the 1st day of June an attack was made at 5 p. m. by the Sixth Corps and the troops under General Smith, the other corps being held in readiness to advance o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 19 (search)
took up a position, which was fortified. On the 29th, by your order, I sent the Second Brigade (Colonel Taylor) to destroy the railroad toward Atlanta, and three regiments under Colonel Bennett, of the Seventy-fifth Illinois, toward West Point for the same purpose. The destruction of the road was performed in the most effectual manner, leaving no rail or tie which could be used for the purpose again. On the morning of the 30th my division moved to Flat Rock, and bivouacked at dark. On the 31st I moved forward, and after some sharp skirmishing drove the enemy from his works on Flint River. On the 1st day of September I moved forward by your order to the Macon railroad and assisted in the destruction of it toward Jonesborough, at which place the enemy was fortified; a sharp skirmish ensued, in which I lost about 50 in killed and wounded, and captured 3 commissioned officers and 19 men, and at night my division was placed in position with Colonel Kirby, First Brigade, on my right, Br
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 21 (search)
icket duty. At night-fall on the 25th we moved to the rear and right, halting at 11 p. m. On the 26th marched at 10 a. m., halting at 9 p. m. On the 27th marched rapidly six miles and halted at Mount Gilead Church and threw up light works. On the 28th we marched to the Montgomery railroad and halted in a large open field, throwing up light works and remaining until the morning of the 30th, when we marched at 10 a. m. At night we halted and threw up light works in sight of the enemy. On the 31st we advanced about one mile and found the enemy strongly fortified in a strong position, but without artillery, and but few men. The works were occupied by our skirmishers. We halted for the night near the Macon railroad, which we reached on the morning of the 1st of September. Moving on the road south we continued to skirmish with the enemy and destroy the road until about 4 p. m. When near Jonesborough I was ordered to form my command on the left of the Eighty-first Indiana and advance, gu
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
king parties destroyed the road. When the work of destruction was completed, I about-faced the brigade, retiring it in line, with flankers out and the skirmishers bringing up the rear. After passing inside the line of works I brought the brigade into column and returned to my former camp. On the 30th. we crossed the West Point road and pushed out in the direction of the Macon railroad. The enemy appeared on our left several times during the day, but were kept off by the flankers. On the 31st we again struck out for the Macon railroad, this brigade in advance. We had not proceeded far when brisk skirmishing ensued, and we discovered a strong line of works in our front. By order of General Kimball I formed my brigade in line and commenced the construction of works. Believing the enemy to be in weak force the skirmishers were ordered forward and soon drove the rebels from their works, which were found to be quite formidable. I brought up the brigade and massed it in the field in
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 25 (search)
he line had not advanced, and that I was without support on either flank, I withdrew the regiment from its advanced position. Our loss was 2 killed and 8 wounded. At night of August 25 our works were abandoned, and we moved to the right, continuing the movement on the 26th, 27th, and 28th, until we reached Red Oak. On the 29th the regiment moved with the brigade toward East Point, to protect troops who were destroying the West Point railroad. On the 30th we again moved to the right. On the 31st we were advancing upon the Macon road, when the enemy was encountered, and line of battle was formed, but the enemy fled without engaging us. That night we fortified our line near the Macon road, south of Rough and Ready. September 1, the regiment was detailed as guard for the ammunition train of the division, and was not engaged in the battle of Jonesborough. September 2, in advancing toward Lovejoy's, the regiment occupied the skirmish line in front of the brigade. We drove the rebels mor
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 33 (search)
and go into camp, only a part of our brigade remaining on the line. Here I remained until 9 p. m. of July 26, when I was ordered to move to the left and front, relieving part of the Second Brigade. After taking this position I was joined on the right by Eightieth Illinois, and on left by Seventy-fifth Illinois. At daylight next morning skirmishing commenced in my front, and in the afternoon a feint was made on the enemy's line. Nothing of great importance occurred until the evening of the 31st, when I received orders to move to right and front, and relieve the Eightieth Illinois, which was in reserve picket. I moved out and remained until next evening and was relieved by Thirty-sixth Indiana, and returned again to camp. On the 3d of August a demonstration was made on my right on skirmish line, which I believe resulted favorably. Nothing in way of movement took place after this until August 19, when I was ordered to advance beyond our skirmish line with Eightyfourth Illinois, and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 49 (search)
cations. Losses while in front of Atlanta were only 3 men wounded. I had returned for duty from absent wounded July 27. August 24, Lieutenant-Colonel Squires, on account of sickness, was carried back to the hospital, when the command again fell to me. On the night of August 25 we were ordered to march, starting about midnight. We moved with the intention, as it was evident afterward, of striking the Macon railroad, and thereby cut off commu. nication between Atlanta and the south. On the 31st we crossed the Montgomery railroad, and on the 1st of September reached the Macon railroad and spent a considerable portion of the day in destroying it. About 6 p. m., having cone up with the enemy intrenched on the railroad near Jonesborough, we were formed in line and maneuvered under a heavy fire from the enemy's artillery and skirmishers until after dark, when we bivouacked for the night and threw up works of defense. Regiment lost 1 man mortally wounded. That night the enemy fell back
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
s rear guard, made about five miles and crossed Camp Creek, going into position on right of General Wood's division; occupied two hills in advance of the line and fortified. Marched at 4 p. m. of 28th about four miles, and camped near Montgomery railroad. On the 29th advanced our lines about half a mile and fortified. August 30, marched at 6 a. m. and crossed the Montgomery railroad near Red Oak. Moved east about six miles and formed line of battle on left of Kimball's division. On the 31st advanced several miles toward Macon railroad, formed line, and fortified three times. About dark [took] position on right of Grose's brigade, and camped. September 1, marched at 7 a. m. and struck Macon railroad near Battle Station; commenced tearing up track and burning rails. Continued at this until afternoon. At 4 p. m. moved on toward Jonesborough, and at 6 p. m. took position on the left of the division, forming in three lines; in accordance with instructions from the general command
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 54 (search)
back, our line advanced within two miles of Atlanta and met with a loss on that day of 1 lieutenant and 2 enlisted men wounded. Took position near the Buck Head road, where strong rifle trenches were formed. This position we held until the commencement of the movement on the Atlanta and Macon Railroad, losing several wounded. My regiment accompanied the army on its late move south of Atlanta and labored in the perfecting of the many works completed by the army. On the night of the 31st instant received orders to report my regiment near Battle Station, on the Macon railroad, which being done by 3 a. m. the following morning, I assisted in tearing up and burning the track southward from that point till near Jonesborough, a distance of eight miles, near which place the enemy was discovered to be in force. The army being in position we moved forward, driving his skirmishers, when darkness overtook and stopped our progress. During the day our loss was 2 enlisted men wounded. Duri
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
ut the day. Saturday, the 27th, the movement was resumed, and the troops moved steadily around the enemy's left toward his rear. Sunday, the 28th, the West Point railway was reached. Monday, the 29th, my division was engaged in destroying the West Point road. Tuesday, the 30th, the movement was resumed to reach the Macon railway. It was considered certain that the destruction of this last line of his rail communications must inevitably compel the enemy to evacuate Atlanta. Wednesday, the 31st, my division, leading the Fourth Corps, and in conjunction with a division of the Twenty-third Corps, made a strong lodgment on the Macon railroad. Early Thursday morning, September 1, the work of destroying the road was commenced, but it was soon discontinued, by an order to move by the Griffin road in the direction of Jonesborough. It was understood that two corps (Hardee's and Lee's) of the rebel army were concentrated there. My division being in reserve for the day and in charge of the
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