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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,040 1,040 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 90 90 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 56 56 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 55 55 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 40 40 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 39 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for July 1st or search for July 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 25 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
Reports etc., of this campaign No. 1Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, U. S. Army, commanding Military Division of the Mississippi. No. 2Organization of the Union forces. No. 3Lieut. Col. Edward D. Kittoe, U. S. Army, Medical Inspector. No. 4Brig. Gen. William F. Barry, U. S. Army, Chief of Artillery. No. 5Capt. Thomas G. Baylor, Ordnance Corps, U. S. Army, Chief of Ordnance. No. 6Capt. Orlando M. Poe, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, Chief Engineer, of operations July 1-October 31. No. 7Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, U. S. Army, commanding Army of the Cumberland. No. 8Surg. George E. Cooper, U. S. Army, Medical Director. No. 9Brig. Gen. John M. Brannan, U. S. Army, Chief of Artillery. No. 10Capt. John Rziha, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry, Acting Engineer Officer, of operations September 1-2. No. 11Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard, U. S. Army, commanding Fourth Army Corps, of operations May 1-July 27. No. 12Maj. Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, commanding Fourth Army Corps, of opera
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
y behind his well-formed breast-works. Failure as it was, and for which I assume the entire responsibility, I yet claim it produced good fruits, as it demonstrated to General Johnston that I would assault and that boldly. And we also gained and held ground so close to the enemy's parapets that he could not show a head above them. It would not do to rest long under the influence of a mistake or failure, and accordingly General Schofield was working strong on the enemy's left, and on the 1st of July I ordered General McPherson to be relieved by General Garrard's cavalry in front of Kenesaw, and rapidly to throw his whole army by the right down to and threaten Nickajack Creek and Turner's Ferry, across the Chattahoochee, and I also pushed General Stoneman's cavalry to the river below Turner's. General McPherson commenced his movement the night of July 2, and the effect was instantaneous. The next morning Kenesaw was abandoned, and with the first dawn of day I saw our skirmishers
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
No. 6. report of Capt. Orlando M. Poe, Corps of Engineers, U, S. Army, Chief engineer, of operations July 1-October 31, 1864. Washington, D. C., October 8, 1865. Sir: In accordance with the circular from the Engineer Bureau, dated September 2, 1865, I have the honor to report as follows, concerning the engineer operations and the works of attack and defense conducted under my superintendence during the year ending June 30, 1865 : This report will naturally be divided into four parts, viz: First. The Atlanta campaign, from the 1st of July, 1864, to the occupation of the city, September 2, 1864. Second. The new defenses of Atlanta and the Savannah campaign, including the time from the 3d of September, 1864, to the 25th of January, 1865. Third. The campaign from Savannah, Ga., to Goldsborough, N. C., from January 25, 1865, to March 22, 1865. Fourth. The campaign from Goldsborough, N. C., to Raleigh, N. C., and the march from Raleigh to Washington City, f
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
vance stubbornly and continued to annoy us very much during the night. My regiments engaged performed their work in an admirable manner. June 25 and 26, occupied the same position, subjected to an annoying fire from the enemy. June 27, at 8 a. m. formed in column, regimental front, supporting in echelon. General Kimball's brigade formed for assault. The assault proving unsuccessful, was withdrawn and placed in same position occupied before. June 28, 29, and 30, occupied same position. July 1, in same position, with heavy skirmish and artillery firing. July 2, late p. m. moved to the left and relieved a portion of General Newton's line. July 3, enemy evacuated, brigade marched via Marietta, and bivouacked in front of enemy, in rear of General Grose's brigade, five miles south of Marietta. July 4, went into position on left of General Grose, pushed forward a strong skirmish line and advanced line of battle; took enemy's skirmish pits and intrenched during the evening. July 5,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
r, no murmur was heard, but the most determined spirit evinced to subdue the enemies of our country. I must specially commend Colonel Price, Colonel Champion, Colonel Taylor, and Colonel McClain, for promptness and efficiency as officers. Also Surgeons Beach, Walton, Wing, Pierce, and Averdick, for care and attention to my sick and wounded. Also of Father Cooney and Chaplain Burkett, for well-timed and faithful ministrations as chaplains. The loss of my brigade was heavy, being, up to July 1: Killedcommissioned officers, 4; enlisted men, 91. Wounded-commissioned officers, 22; enlisted men, 380. Missing-commissioned officers, 2; enlisted men, 60. Making a total of killed, wounded, and missing in officers, of 28 ; and of enlisted men, 531. Grand total, 559. For particulars of loss to each portion of thq command, and at what time, see tabular statement as part of this report. We took in prisoners 3 officers and 88 enlisted men; total 91. (See provostmarshal's statement.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 26 (search)
No. 22. report of Lieut. Col. Augustus G. Tassin, Thirty-fifth Indiana Infantry, of operations July I-September 8. Hdqrs. Thirty-Fifth Indiana Volunteers, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Captain: In compliance with circular of September 10, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Thirty-fifth Regiment Indiana Infantry Volunteers during the recent campaign, from July 1, 1864, to the fall of Atlanta: On July 1 the regiment was stationed in front of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., occupying a reserve position in rear of the second line of our works. On the evening of the 2d the regiment changed position to the left with the brigade, taking the place of the Second Division, Fourth Corps, which moved out. The following morning, the enemy having evacuated their position on Kenesaw Mountain, the regiment took the line of march in pursuit, passing through Marietta, coming up again with the enemy about four miles south of that place. Here the brigade w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
ng occurred; 1 man killed. June 26, all quiet during the day; still occupy the same works. June 27, still on front line; were relieved at dark by the Fifty-ninth Illinois and retired to the rear line. June 28, remained in second line during the day; no fighting in our front. June 29, still on the second line; quite brisk skirmishing during the night; regiment was inspected in the afternoon. June 30, still remain in second line; no fighting in our front; regiment was mustered to-day. July 1, hold the same position on the second line. Nothing of importance transpired until evening, when a brisk cannonading was opened along our lines and continued a considerable time. July 2, remained in second line until evening, when the left wing moved to the front line, and one company was sent out for picket. July 3, the enemy evacuated our front during the night, and [his works] were soon after occupied by our troops. We followed them through Marietta and three miles beyond, where they
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
wounded. On Tuesday, June 28, we had considerable skirmishing, and had 1 commissioned officer and 2 enlisted men wounded. On Wednesday, June 29, a burial of the dead in our front under a flag of truce took place. During the night the enemy made a demonstration, but were repulsed. The casualties of the regiment were 3 enlisted men wounded. On Thursday, June 30, at dark, my regiment was relieved by another regiment of our brigade, and we moved back to the second line and encamped. On Friday, July 1, we continued in camp on the second line. On Saturday, July 2, the regiment again moved forward to the front line; no casualties. On Sunday, July 3, about 2 a. m., the rebels evacuated their works, and we moved forward at once and occupied them. Took several prisoners. We then moved forward to Marietta and five miles beyond to Smyrna, where we found the enemy strongly fortified. On Monday, July 4, at 11 a.,m. we charged the enemy's works, capturing the rifle-pits, with a large numbe
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
orced to fall back. The One hundred and twenty-fifth retired to the pits occupied by the enemy during the morning, and held them half an hour after the column had withdrawn, and until after relieved by fresh troops. The entire loss of the regiment during the engagement amounted to 1 officer killed, 2 mortally wounded, and 8 officers more or less severely wounded; 6 men killed, 8 mortally wounded, and 33 men more or less severely wounded. June 28, 29, and 30, remained in trenches resting. July 1 and 2, remained quietly behind works. July 3, the enemy having evacuated his works during the night, the One hundred and twenty-fifth joined in the pursuit at 6 a. m. and bivouacked at five miles below Marietta near the railroad, confronting the enemy. July 4, changed position and fortified; the enemy withdrew during the night. July 5, marched at 7 a. m. and bivouacked at night near Vining's Station. July 6, 7, and 8, rested in bivouac, men washing, &c. July 9, 10, and 11, moved with the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 80 (search)
1 man wounded on the 20th. (See list.) On the 22d we again advanced our lines, Companies C and D, under the command of First Lieut. Albert Upson, on the skirmish line and took a heavy line of the enemy's picket-pits, but were compelled to fall back, because of the line on our left not moving up promptly. Our loss this day, 6 killed and 15 wounded. (See list annexed.) In this position we remained, varying the lines slightly, until the 3d day of July, having lost 1 man wounded on June 26, and 1 killed and 1 wounded on the 29th of June on skirmish line. On the night of the 2d of July the enemy abandoned his position on Kenesaw Mountain. On the morning of the 3d we marched in pursuit, passing to the south of Marietta. Marched six miles and bivouacked for the night. On the 4th we moved to the left and front, skirmishing with the enemy; formed our line, and threw up works. In this affair the command lost 1 man killed, 2 wounded, and 2 taken prisoners. On the night of the 4th the
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