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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
along a ridge at right angles to the abovenamed road, and one-quarter of a mile from the station. He quickly drove the enemy from his barricades and pushed on to the river, where he arrived in time to save a greater part of the enemy's bridge. The dismounted cavalry seemed to have retreated by a river road, that we did not then know, toward the railroad bridge, and therefore escaped capture. This accomplished, the command went into camp on the high ground near to and facing the river. July 6, 7, and 8, remained in position, making an occasional demonstration and feint as if to throw a bridge, with a view to keep as large a force of the enemy on the opposite bank as possible. July 9, in accordance with instructions from department headquarters, General Newton's division was sent to Roswell Factory to support General Garrard's cavalry in effecting a crossing of the Chattahoochee at that point. He crossed and made a bridge-head. July 10, Stanley's and Wood's divisions move
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
July 2, late p. m. moved to the left and relieved a portion of General Newton's line. July 3, enemy evacuated, brigade marched via Marietta, and bivouacked in front of enemy, in rear of General Grose's brigade, five miles south of Marietta. July 4, went into position on left of General Grose, pushed forward a strong skirmish line and advanced line of battle; took enemy's skirmish pits and intrenched during the evening. July 5, enemy evacuated, brigade marched to the Chattahoochee River. July 6, 7, 8, and 9, occupied same position. July 10, at 10 a. m. marched on road leading up the river, camped within one mile of pontoon crossing. July 11, occupied same position. July 12, crossed the river and went into position on high bluff one mile below crossing. July 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, occupied same position. July 18, brigade marched out Atlanta road at 5 a. m., following General Newton's division; camped near Buck Head. July 19, marched about three miles and went into position on
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
ructed works. My regiment built three separate lines of works during the day. Relieved the Fifty-ninth Illinois on the front line just after dark, and worked all night on the works partially constructed by them. Our loss during the day was 1 officer and 9 privates wounded. July 5, the enemy evacuated our front during the night. We followed them closely to the Chattahoochee River, where they again made a stand. We took position on a hill overlooking the river and encamped for the night. July 6, remained in camp all day; nothing transpired in our front. July 7, arranged camp in proper order and prepared for a few days' rest. July 8, still resting quietly in camp; moved about three miles up the river. July 9, 10, and II, remained quietly in camp. July 12, moved across and some two miles down the Chattahoochee River, and again went into camp, our right resting on the river and running at right angles with it. Built a line of log works in front of the regiment. July 13, 14, 15, 1
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
killing and wounding several of the enemy; our loss was 1 commissioned officer wounded and 1 enlisted man killed, and 17 enlisted men wounded. During the night the enemy fell back to the Chattahoochee River and left us in full possession of their strong works at Smyrna, which we immediately occupied. On Tuesday, July 5, at daybreak we commenced pursuing the enemy. The regiment moved forward to Vining's Station, thence one mile to the left and encamped on the Chattahoochee River. On Wednesday, July 6, the regiment lay in camp, our skirmishers exchanging occasional shots across the river. We lay in this camp until the 10th. On Sunday, July 10, we marched up the river about five miles, where the regiment encamped within about one-half mile of the river, and continued in camp until the 12th. On Tuesday, July 12, we marched early, crossed the Chattahoochee on canvas pontoons, and moved down the river some distance, to a high bluff overlooking the river, where we encamped until the 1
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
. Formed at Neal Dow Station, to the left and rear of General Stanley's division, which had encountered the enemy there. July 4, moved forward and formed on the left of General Stanley, who had advanced his skirmish and main lines, took some of the enemy's rifle-pits and captured prisoners. The enemy retired this night. July 5, marched, following General Wood, who had a skirmish with the enemy's cavalry near Pace's Ferry, driving them over it. Encamped near Vining's Station, in reserve. July 6, remained in camp. July 7, moved camp, our left resting on Rottenwood Creek. July 8, remained in camp. July 9, marched to Roswell to support Garrard's cavalry and occupy any ground they had gained after crossing the river. Crossed the river about dusk at Shallow Ford and relieved the cavalry, who recrossed to the north side, except their picket in front. July 10, adjusted our lines and made a t~te-de-pont. General Dodge, with two divisions of the Sixteenth Corps, arrived to-day and reli
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
ore or less severely wounded. June 28, 29, and 30, remained in trenches resting. July 1 and 2, remained quietly behind works. July 3, the enemy having evacuated his works during the night, the One hundred and twenty-fifth joined in the pursuit at 6 a. m. and bivouacked at five miles below Marietta near the railroad, confronting the enemy. July 4, changed position and fortified; the enemy withdrew during the night. July 5, marched at 7 a. m. and bivouacked at night near Vining's Station. July 6, 7, and 8, rested in bivouac, men washing, &c. July 9, 10, and 11, moved with the division to support McCook's cavalry, which had effected a crossing of the Chattahcochee River at Roswell, twelve miles above Vining's. July 12, 13, and 14, returned to Vining's Station, crossed the Chattahoochee River at Powers' Ferry, and constructed breast-works at a point two miles farther south. July 15, 16, and 17, remained quietly in camp; no enemy appeared in our immediate front. July 18, the entire c
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
ront, as well as all along the line of the Kenesaw, and at daylight, July 3, we beheld with delight the Stars and Stripes floating proudly and defiantly on the summit of Kenesaw Mountain. July 3, pursued the enemy southward, passing through Marietta, and encamping three miles south, at or near Station Neal Dow. July 4, remained in camp. During the night of the 4th the enemy retreated. July 5, advanced to the bank of the Chattahoochee River, and encamped at Pace's Ferry. Remained in [camp] July 6, 7, 8, 9. July 10, took up line of march to the left of the army, as a support to the Twenty-third Corps, crossing the river. July 11, crossed the Chattahoochee River on pontoons at Edwards Ferry. July 12, remained in camp on south bank of the river. July 13, moved to the right about one mile and built breast-works and skirmished with the enemy. Casualties, 1 man taken prisoner. (See schedule, marked A.) July 14, 15, 16, remained in our works. July 17, advanced to the right, to cover th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
ry in position, was untiring in securing everything possible, and the best and most commanding positions for his command. Capt. S. M. McDowell, Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Light Battery,! Captain Simonson's successor, was equally brave and energetic, and lost his life at his guns upon the morning of June 27, in the terrible charge upon the enemy's works at Kenesaw Mountain. Lieut. O. H. P. Ayres, commanding Sixth Ohio Light Battery, who was killed while reconnoitering in front of his position July 6, was a valuable officer, and lost his life while endeavoring to obtain all the information possible bearing upon his position. Capt. Theodore S. Thomasson, First Kentucky Light Battery, succeeded Captain McDowell as chief of artillery of First Division, June 27, and has proved a valuable and thorough officer. Capt. C. C. Aleshire, Eighteenth Ohio Light Battery, chief of artillery, Second Division, was relieved by Capt. W. F. Goodspeed June--ultimo, who, while in command of the artillery at
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 84 (search)
ght; took position on General Stanley's front, by order Captain Bridges, chief of artillery, Fourth Army Corps; remained in this position about three hours; was relieved and moved back to my division; had 1 man slightly wounded; moved into position on General Wagner's front; did no firing. July 5, the enemy having evacuated during the night, marched at 6 a. m. in rear of division eight miles to Chattahoochee River; went into a position on a ridge near the river, commanding pontoon bridge. July 6, threw up works in front of the guns during the night; remained in same position as that of the 5th; fired four rounds without getting any reply from the enemy. July 7, remained in same position, everything quiet; opened on the enemy at 8 p. m., by order of Captain Bridges, chief of artillery, Fourth Army Corps; fired seventy-seven rounds; got no reply from the enemy. July 8, lay quietly in camp; no firing on either side. July 9, remained in same position; opened on enemy's battery at 2 p
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 85 (search)
assigned to a new position to the left and near the south terminus of the mountain. In a fierce duel with the enemy's artillery on the afternoon of June 21 senior Second Lieut. Franklin Seeborn was severely wounded in the foot; Private Minford S. Clark was wounded in the right hand. In these engagements 2 horses were killed and 1 severly wounded. On the 22d of June one gun was struck by a 12-pounder shot and disabled. The battery had. part in no important engagements from this time until July 6, when it was placed in a good position on the right bank of the Chattahoochee River, commanding a rebel battery and covering a pontoon bridge, which the enemy made several unsuccessful attempts to remove. On the 9th instant Private Johnson R. Hathaway was killed by a musket-ball. The battery crossed the Chattahoochee River with the entire Fourth Corps to the left of our line on the 12th instant, took position in line of battle near the river, and remained without important engagements unti
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